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ENGL 1202 + ENGL 1204 | First-Year English

KPU English Students

In both ENGL 1202 and ENGL 1204, students will engage in writing-intensive activities as they analyze literary texts. They will apply literary analysis through close reading, informed discussion, and formal writing.  Most ENGL 1202 sections focus on topics chosen by the individual instructors. ENGL 1204 involves the study of genres (poetry, drama, fiction, etc.) and some instructors of ENGL 1204 have topics as well. NOTE:  This list is subject to change without notice.

ENGL1202 and 1204 Topics for Spring 2019*

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10 - Gaye Hickman-Barr

Voice from Four Continents! Listen to four women writers from four different continents re-defining the notion of the writer's authority. We analyze the use of the double voice, hear echoes of oral practices and read their subversion of patriarchy.

ENGL 1202 L11 - Brian Swail

The Grand Tour. A great work of literature can transport you to unexpected places. We will look at a sample of several centuries worth of great works (with suspects both usual and unusual) – pack your bags!

ENGL 1204 L10 - Betty-Anne Buirs

The Reflected Self. Other people don’t always see us the way we see ourselves.  We’ll study how a range of characters respond to the image of themselves they see reflected in other people’s eyes.

ENGL 1204 L11 - Betty-Anne Buirs

The Reflected Self. Other people don’t always see us the way we see ourselves.  We’ll study how a range of characters respond to the image of themselves they see reflected in other people’s eyes.

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10 - Andrew Bartlett

Animal Stories. Feral cats and loyal dogs, war horses and alligator kings. In this section we read some texts that ask questions about human-animal relationships and others that picture what wild animals experience on their own, free of human interference. Some children's and young adult literature included.

ENGL 1202 R11 - Paul Ostrowski

Conflict. Conflict is central to all forms of art. Whether in music, visual arts or Literature, conflict provides the necessary “energy” to compel our attention. This course will examine the role of conflict in poetry, short fiction, and drama; we will focus on different forms of conflict and their role in the development of tone, plot, and character.

ENGL 1202 R12 - Andrew Bartlett

Animal Stories. Feral cats and loyal dogs, war horses and alligator kings. In this section we read some texts that ask questions about human-animal relationships and others that picture what wild animals experience on their own, free of human interference. Some children's and young adult literature included.

ENGL 1202 R13 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society. Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL 1202 R14 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10 - Nate Szymanski

Talking Animals. This course focuses on literary texts that imagine new ways of thinking about animals. The texts, showcasing a variety of genres and from various historical periods, include letters written by foxes, poetic debates about birds, and a man who wakes up to realize he has somehow transformed into a bug. 

ENGL 1202 S11 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society. Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL 1202 S12 - TBA

ENGL 1202 S13 - Wendy Smith

Conformity and Resistance. There are many ways in which social and political forces influence our lives.  What strategies can be used to resist oppressive forces?  And what are the consequences of action/non-action? Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, we will examine how various writers have addressed these questions.

ENGL 1202 S50 - Kurt Klotz

False Realities and the Limits of Knowledge. How do we know what we know? This is an essential question in this course, which examines how authors depict limits of knowledge, particularly in relation to topics such as self, evil, memory, and perception. 

ENGL 1202 S51 - TBA

ENGL 1202 S52 - Steve Weber

War Literature. In these times of constant sabre-rattling, manipulative fear-mongering, and interminable wars, a democratic people ignores war narratives at its peril. While reading some of the best war literature of the twentieth century, students in this course will begin to understand what it might be like to live through war.

ENGL 1204 S10 - Kiran Clements

The Sound of Silence. This course will examine the paradox of how silence is "written into" literary texts in order to convey themes, evoke emotions and communicate meaning. We will approach this subject through an analysis of texts as varied as film, drama, poetry, short story and the graphic novel.

Online Courses

ENGL 1202 A75 - Ranjini Mendis

The Journey and The Traveler. This fully online section will feature physical, imaginary, and metaphorical journeys, and how people change (or don't) through their experiences. You will be given plenty of opportunity to develop your expository, interpretive, and analytical skills.


ENGL1202 and 1204 Topics for Fall 2018*

Fall 2018 1200-level Courses

Fall 2018 1200-level Courses


ENGL1202 and 1204 Topics for Summer 2018*

1202 1204 Summer 2018


ENGL1202 and 1204 Topics for Spring 2018*

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10         Joakim Nilsson

Girls and Boys; Men and Women - Reading a variety of literary works from different times and cultures, we will explore how writers try to represent the way human beings grow, learn, change, love, hate, age, and die.

ENGL 1202 L11         Gaye Hickman-Barr

Voices from Four Continents! - Listen to four women writers from four different continents re-defining the notion of the writer's authority. We analyze the use of the double voice, hear echoes of oral practices and read their subversion of patriarchy.

ENGL 1204 L10        Betty Anne Buirs

The Reflected Self - Other people don’t always see us the way we see ourselves.  We’ll study how a range of characters respond to the image of themselves they see reflected in other people’s eyes. 

ENGL 1204 L11        Betty Anne Buirs

The Reflected Self - Other people don’t always see us the way we see ourselves.  We’ll study how a range of characters respond to the image of themselves they see reflected in other people’s eyes. 

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R11         Deborah Blenkhorn

Literature Then and Now - Reading from a completely online syllabus (no textbook required), rediscover some of the classics along with some of today's cutting-edge literary works.  Writing about literature and sharing our interpretations in a way that informs our perspective on life will be the focus of our course.

ENGL 1202 R12      Kegan Doyle

Rebel, Rebel - “Hey, Johnny, what are you rebelling against?” “What have you got?”  So says Marlon Brando’s character Johnny Strabler in the Hollywood classic The Wild One. In this course, we will focus on poems, songs, stories, films, and plays by, about, and for rebels. We will discuss rebels without causes and rebels with them, political rebels, rock and roll rebels, religious rebels and artistic rebels. Among other things, we will ask why and how individuals and groups rebel and what happens to them when they do.

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10          John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs - Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack the powerful and vulnerable: magicians, lovers, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

ENGL 1202 S11         Paul Tyndall

Shakespearean Afterlives - Learn about the many ways Shakespeare's plays continue to speak to audiences through stage productions, adaptations and appropriations on television, film and in popular culture. Readings include The Taming of the Shrew, Richard III and The Tempest.

ENGL 1202 S12         Robert Dearle

Becoming Modern - What does it mean to become “modern?” What does it mean for the individual, for culture, for society? These are the questions occupied writers at the dawn of the 20th century as they glimpsed toward the world to come. In this section we will explore their responses to the promise and the peril of modernity.

ENGL 1202 S13         Fred Ribkoff

PTSD: Literary and Cinematic Representations of Trauma - In this course, we explore how writers of drama, fiction and poetry and filmmakers represent the struggle to cope with traumatic experience.

ENGL 1202 S14         Brian Swail

Fairy tale, fantasy, horror, science fiction: each of these genres draws the reader into a world that is both unfamiliar and strangely familiar. Visiting these worlds can leave us simultaneously enlightened and (instructively) mystified. Welcome the wonder!

ENGL 1202 S17        Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature - Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society.  Through discussions of poems, plays, short stories and a novel, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL 1202 S18        Wendy Smith

Conformity and Resistance - There are many ways in which social and political forces influence our lives.  What strategies can be used to resist oppressive forces?  And what are the consequences of action/non-action? Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, we will examine how various writers have addressed these questions.

ENGL 1202 S19        Wendy Smith

Conformity and Resistance - There are many ways in which social and political forces influence our lives.  What strategies can be used to resist oppressive forces?  And what are the consequences of action/non-action? Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, we will examine how various writers have addressed these questions.

ENGL 1202 S50      Kelly Doyle

Contemporary Horror- Why do we love horror stories? Critically examine the horror genre via comics, graphic novels, short fiction, and film/television clips/viewings in this class. Via monsters, zombies, and more, we’ll discuss sexuality and gender, class and race, nature versus civilization, liminality, and how monsters/humans are defined.

ENGL 1204 S10        Heather Cyr

Individuality - In this course we will investigate the theme of individuality in four different genres: short stories, poetry, novels and drama. We’ll examine how these works construct unique characters, how these characters create and maintain their individuality, and why their society either values or rejects them. Our primary emphasis will be on the generic forms of fiction, poetry and drama and how they relate to our theme.

ENGL 1204 S11           Shelley Boyd

You Are What You Say You Eat - Taking its inspiration from the phrase “You Are What You Eat,” this course examines food's expressive potential within literature.  Food and identity will be our central concerns as we explore fiction, poetry, drama, and other genres, such as the recipe.

 

Online Courses

ENGL 1202 A75       Ranjini Mendis

The Journey and the Traveler - In this fully online course, we will read a literary selection on physical, imaginary, and metaphorical journeys -- and how people change (or don't) through their experiences. You will have good opportunities to develop your expository, interpretive, and analytical writing skills.


ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Fall 2017*

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10       Asma Sayed

Folks, Fairies and Fiction - Discover the main features of traditional oral folk tales and their adaptations in print, as well as in literary fairy tales. We will critically examine fairy tales and folk tales, and the interrelationship between media, technology and popular literature.

ENGL 1202 L11           Gaye Hickman-Barr

Voices from Four Continents! - Listen to four women writers from four different continents re-defining the notion of the writer's authority. We analyze the use of the double voice, hear echoes of oral practices and read their subversion of patriarchy.

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10            Gillian Dearle

Utopia and Its Discontents - Meaning both "good place" and "no place," utopia has been used by writers to reflect on the present and to explore the possibilities and perils of the future. As our fears regarding the future mount, utopia is overshadowed by its nemesis, dystopia. Join us as we trace the evolution of utopia from dream to nightmare.

ENGL 1202 R11            Elizabeth Gooding

Looking at the Natural World - What does literature suggest about our connection to nature—or our disconnection from it?  Bring your metaphorical hiking boots as we explore poems, stories, essays, a novel, and documentaries that address this question.

ENGL 1202 R12             Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction - Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL 1204 R11           Kegan Doyle

Rebel, Rebel - “Hey, Johnny, what are you rebelling against?”  “What have you got?”  So says Marlon Brando’s character Johnny Strabler in the Hollywood classic The Wild One. In this course, we will focus on poems, songs, stories, films, and plays by, about, and for rebels. We will discuss rebels without causes and rebels with them, political rebels, rock and roll rebels, religious rebels and artistic rebels.  Among other things, we will ask why and how individuals and groups rebel and what happens to them when they do.  Authors to be discussed include Sylvia Plath, Bob Dylan, Edgar Allan Poe, T.C. Boyle, Christopher Marlowe, Kurt Cobain, Alice Walker, and William Blake. 

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10             Wendy Smith

Conformity and Resistance - There are many ways in which social and political forces influence our lives.  What strategies can be used to resist oppressive forces?  And what are the consequences of action/non-action? Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, we will examine how various writers have addressed these questions.

ENGL 1202 S11              Greg Chan

Literary Constructions of House and Home - Location, location, location. More than just a real estate maxim, this aspiration to find one's place—whether it be geographically, socially or spiritually—is a recurring theme in literature. Join us to define what home is, as we question perceptions of homeland, class, travel, and homelessness.​

ENGL 1202 S12             Paul Ohler  

Race, Religion, and Gender in U.S. Literature - This course will introduce students to classic works of U.S. literature of the period 1850-1910 engaged with issues of race, religion, and gender. Through the reading of novels, essays, short stories, and poetry, we will seek to learn about the ways authors depicted extremely divisive social issues, and consider the potential of literature to function as social criticism. 

ENGL 1202 S13             Paul Tyndall

Gods and Monsters: The Idea of Monstrosity in Literature and Film - In this course, we will examine representations of monstrosity in literature and film, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf and Shakespeare's The Tempest to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. We also look at recent cinematic representations of monstrosity, such as "The Silence of the Lambs," "Monster" and "No Country for Old Men."

ENGL 1202 S14              John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs - Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack the powerful and vulnerable: magicians, lovers, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

ENGL 1202 S15       Asma Sayed

Folks, Fairies and Fiction - Discover the main features of traditional oral folk tales and their adaptations in print, as well as in literary fairy tales. We will critically examine fairy tales and folk tales, and the interrelationship between media, technology and popular literature.

ENGL 1202 S16              Jennifer Hardwick

Stories of Resistance - Through a close examination of contemporary North American literature and media this section of 1202 will explore how individuals and communities use stories to challenge power structures, demand justice, and seek personal and collective rights.

ENGL 1202 S17 & S50       Kiran Toor

Quick Lit and Questioning It - We dispense with heavy novels and focus on literary works that can be read in less than a day (often in less than an hour!) and ask ourselves: "Can a short work be a literary masterpiece?"

ENGL 1204 S10        Heather Cyr

Individuality - In this course we will investigate the theme of individuality in four different genres: short stories, poetry, novels and drama. We’ll examine how these works construct unique characters, how these characters create and maintain their individuality, and why their society either values or rejects them. Our primary emphasis will be on the generic forms of fiction, poetry and drama and how they relate to our theme.

 

*More topics may be announced in the coming weeks

All prerequisite waivers for ENGL classes must be approved by the Chair of English, Dr. Robert Dearle. Please contact him by email: Robert.Dearle@kpu.ca.