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Welcome to the B.C. Food System Policy Database

This database is a centralized resource for planners, policy makers, community advocates, local organizations and the policy curious to search for policy precedents and to better understand how local government policy in B.C. is addressing local food systems. Search by a range of characteristics to find food system policies that have been adopted by local governments across B.C. For more information about using the database and how it was developed see How to use the Database

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Institute for Sustainable Food Systems

Displaying 21 - 30 of 211 Results

Topic: Education, First Nations and Indigenous Food Systems, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Nutrition and Public Health

Sub-topics: community food system education

Region: Kitimat-Stikine | Document Type: Comprehensive Community Plan (gitanmaax) | Year: 2012

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Topic Subtopic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food sales, access and procurement;

nutrition and public health;

first nations and indigenous food systems;

  Continue to enhance the implementation of the meals on wheels and in-home care services for Elders. 2.3

food access, sales and procurement;

education;

first nations and indigenous food systems;

community food system education; Deliver community workshops on food knowledge and food preparation and preservation skills. 2.4

 

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: pilot project, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Capital | Document Type: Pilot Program | Year: 2016

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Under the Food Tree Stewardship pilot program residents can apply to partner with community organization to plant food trees on  City parks & green spaces. See attached guide for details.

Topic: Economic Development, Education, First Nations and Indigenous Food Systems, Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Water Management, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: soil, research and data collection, water rate for agriculture, pollinators, wildlife and ecosystem management, irrigation and drainage, farmland trust, agri-tourism, partnerships/advocacy/liaising

Region: Capital | Document Type: Food Strategy | Year: 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
policy partnerships, advocacy and development;   Establish a Regional Food and Agriculture (RFA) Task Force to develop an organizational structure that supports regional collaboration and strategic decision-making.  5.1
education;   Develop food and agricultural education, experience and expertise.  5.2 (i)
policy partnerships, advocacy and development;   Embed food and agricultural experience
and expertise within the CRD.
5.2 (ii)
  research and data collection;  iii) Maintain and improve regional food and
agriculture data.
5.2 (iii)
wildlife/environmental/pest management; soil; Consider food and agriculture interests with a goal of improving the region’s soils. 5.3
water management; irrigation and drainage; Where possible, support municipal efforts towards watershed management with a goal to address drainage issues impacting the region’s most fertile soils. 5.4
wildlife/environmental/pest management; wildlife and ecosystem management; i) Continue to consider food and agriculture interests in regional wildlife management discussions and projects.  5.5(i)
wildlife/environmental/pest management;

pollinators;

wildlife and ecosystem management;

ii) Consider emerging wildlife and
environmental issues e.g. beneficial
species (pollinators), invasive and
problematic species. 
5.5 (ii)
water management; water rate for agriculture; Continue to provide affordable water rates for rural farm operations, and through direction from the water commissions, consider extending them to urban agriculture operations. 5.6

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

First Nations and indigenous food systems;

partnerships/ advocacy/liaising; Continue to develop meaningful relationships with Aboriginal communities through regional food and agriculture discussions and activities. 5.7

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

First Nations and indigenous food systems;

partnerships/ advocacy/liaising; Pursue regional food and agriculture related partnerships and activities between Aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities, agencies and groups. 5.8
  farmland trust; Initiate a process to establish a regional food and farmland trust. 5.9
economic development; agri-tourism;  ii) Support strategic business development initiatives for the region’s food and
agriculture sector including agri-tourism.
5.10 (ii)

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Economic Development, Education, Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Water Management, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: ALR subdivision, agricultural industry services, ALR, irrigation and drainage, farmers' markets, food processing, home occupation/home based businesses, agri-tourism, community food system education, food storage, food distribution, wildlife and ecosystem management, partnerships/advocacy/liaising, zoning, aquaculture, research and data collection

Region: Nanaimo | Document Type: | Year: 2011

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

development and productive use of agricultural land;

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

ALR;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

Recognize the importance of agriculture to the region’s economy. To this end, the RDN and member municipalities agree to:

Encourage the provincial government to protect the agricultural land base through the ALR;

7.14
development and productive use of agricultural land; ALR; Support the agricultural use of ALR lands within designated Urban Areas or Rural Village Areas except in instances where urban land uses have already been established at the time of the adoption of this RGS;
 
7.14
  research and data collection; Support the preparation of a study of agriculture in the region for the purpose of identifying the issues and needs (both immediate and future) of the agricultural sector; 7.14
economic development;   Encourage and support value-added agricultural industries; and 7.14
development and productive use of agricultural land;   Enhance opportunities for agricultural activity on lands not in the ALR. 7.14
  aquaculture;

Recognize the importance of shellfish aquaculture to the region’s economy and environment. To this end the RDN and member municipalities agree to:

Support the management of the Shellfish Aquaculture leases by the provincial and federal governments;

7.15

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

wildlife/environmental/pest management;

aquaculture; Work collaboratively with the provincial and federal government to protect the shellfish aquaculture leases from wastewater or industrial runoff contamination;
 
7.15
economic development; aquaculture; Encourage and support value-added shellfish  aquaculture industries;  7.15
development and productive use of agricultural land;

ALR;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

Encourage and support the Agricultural Land Commission in retaining lands within the ALR for agricultural purposes. 8.1

development and productive use of agricultural land;

ALR subdivision;

ALR;

Discourage the subdivision of agricultural lands. 8.2
economic development; zoning; Include provisions in their official community plans and zoning bylaws to allow for complementary land uses and activities that support the on-going viability of farming operations. 8.3
development and productive use of agricultural land; ALR; Establish agriculture as the priority use on land in the ALR. 8.4

development and productive use of agricultural land;

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

ALR; Minimize the potential impact non-farm land uses may have on farming operations and include policies in their official community plans and zoning bylaws that reduce the opportunity for land use conflicts to occur. 8.5
  home occupation/home based businesses; Encourage and support agricultural activity on lands that are not within the ALR. This may include small-scale home-based agricultural businesses. 8.6
economic development;

farmers' market;

food processing;

agricultural industry services;

agri-tourism;

Recognize the importance of value-added agricultural uses and complementary land use activities for the economic viability of farms. To support complementary farm uses, official community plans should consider:

· The provision of appropriately located agricultural support services and infrastructure;

· Reducing impediments to agricultural processing and related land uses;

· Allowing compatible complementary land use activities (e.g., agri-tourism);

· Allowing farmers’ markets and other outlets that sell local produce to locate in all parts of the community.

8.7

food production;

education;

urban agriculture;

community food system education; Encourage urban agriculture initiatives and support activities and programs that increase awareness of local food production within the region. 8.8
water management; irrigation and drainage; Support the appropriate use of water resources for irrigation of agricultural lands. 8.9
water management; irrigation and drainage; Support the provision of drainage infrastructure to flood-prone lands that do not lie within environmentally sensitive areas. 8.10

food sales, access and procurement;

economic development;

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

irrigation and drainage; Work in collaboration with federal and provincial agencies, adjacent regional districts, and agricultural organizations to improve access to markets for agricultural products. 8.11

economic development;

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising; Support partnerships and collaborate with non-profit groups to enhance the economic viability of farms. 8.12
wildlife/environmental/pest management; wildlife and ecosystem management; Support farms that produce organic agricultural products and use sustainable farming practices. 8.13

food processing, storage and distribution;

food sales, access and procurement;

food processing;

food storage;

food distribution;

aquaculture;

Support the production, processing, distribution and sale of locally grown produce (including shellfish). 8.14

Topic: Food Production

Sub-topics: crops, GE/GMO

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Other | Year: 2012

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City of Richmond Regular Council Meeting Minutes responding to City Of Richmond: Response To Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution. See Council Meeting Minutes, May 28th, 2012 for details. See excerpt below:

 

" 8. City Of Richmond: Response To Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution

(File Ref. No. 008-4040-08-01) (REDMS No. 3518727, 3523078, 3523135, 3521708)

 

(1) WHEREAS for the purposes of this resolution the following terms are defined accordingly:

“Genetic Engineering and Modification / Genetically Engineered and Modified (G.E., G.M., G.M.O.)” refers to the direct manipulation of an organism’s DNA using recombinant DNA technology.  For the purposes of this resolution genetic engineering does NOT include traditional selective breeding, conjugation, fermentation, hybridization, in vitro fertilization, tissue culture, or marker assisted selection;

(2) WHEREAS such crops may pose health and other risks; and

(3) WHEREAS there are now a limited number of such crops grown in the City of Richmond each year,

 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED:

(1) That the City of Richmond hereby opposes the cultivation of genetically engineered plants and trees in the City of Richmond with the exception of existing GMO crops, and that from this Resolution forward, no further GM crops, trees, or plants should be grown in the City of Richmond. This also includes GM fruit trees, all GM plants and shrubbery, GM vegetables, GM commodity crops and any and all field tests for medical and experimental GM crops;

(2) That Option 1: Support Consumer Choice/Advocate for Strengthened Senior Government Management as described in the report titled “City of Richmond: Response to Genetically Engineered Free BC Resolution”, dated April 26, 2012, from the Interim Director, Sustainability and District Energy be endorsed;

(3) That letters be sent on behalf of Council to the Prime Minister, Premier and leaders of the Federal and Provincial opposition, and copied to relevant Ministers in the Federal and Provincial governments, Richmond MPs and MLAs, Metro Vancouver, UBCM, the LMLGA, and the FCM, advising of these resolutions and requesting strengthened management of genetically modified plants, including the introduction of mandatory labelling requirements, more transparent assessment procedures and enhanced communication with the public; and

(4) That the City of Richmond agrees to revisit this resolution as pertinent new information becomes available that affects this resolution.

 

ADOPTED ON CONSENT

 

..."

retrieved from http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/agendas/council/2012/052812_minutes.htm, February 2017

Topic: Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics:

Region: Capital | Document Type: Other | Year: amended 2016

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Topic Subtopic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

urban agriculture;

policy partnerships, advocacy and development

  Enhance and Steward Public Spaces, Green Spaces and Food Systems

goal 8

pg 14

 

Topic: Water Management

Sub-topics: water restrictions and conservation

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2014

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 A bylaw to provide for regulations governing water conservation within the District
of Squamish.

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, livestock, pollinators, urban chickens

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2009

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

urban chickens;

livestock;

Keeping of Urban Hens (As amended by Bylaw No. 2335, 2014)

The keeping of up to five (5) Hens is permitted provided that no neighbourhood health, environmental or nuisance problems result. Universities are not restricted to the number of hens for educational purposes.

42. A person who keeps one (1) or more Hens, up to a maximum of five (5), must:
(a) be a resident of the property where the Hens are kept;
(b) keep no more than five (5) Hens on any parcel of land despite the number of permissible dwelling units on that parcel;
(c) not keep a Rooster;
(d) ensure that all Hens are kept within a secure Coop from sunset to 7:00 a.m.;
(e) ensure that each Hen remains at all other times in a Coop or Pen;
(f) not permit a Hen within a residential dwelling unit or on a balcony or deck;
(g) provide a Coop and a Pen each with a minimum of 0.37m2 in floor area and 0.92m in height per Hen;
(h) provide each Hen with its own nesting box and perch that is at least fifteen (15) centimetres long;
(i) not keep a Hen in a cage unless for the purposes of transport of the Hen;
(j) ensure that the Coop and Pen do not exceed 10m2 floor area or 2m in height;
(k) ensure that the Coop and Pen are situated in a back yard only which has a continuous fence that is in accordance to the Zoning Bylaw;
(l) ensure that the Coop is situated in accordance with the accessory building setbacks identified in the Zoning Bylaw;
(m) ensure that the Coop and Pen are situated at least 3m away from any windows or dwelling doors;
(n) ensure that the Coop and Pen are situated in such a way that would reasonably prevent entry by wildlife;
(o) ensure that the Coop and Pen are fully enclosed by electric fencing and situated no less than 1 metre from the electric fencing per the Zoning Bylaw;
(p) maintain each Coop and Pen in good repair and sanitary condition, and free from vermin and obnoxious smells and substances;
(q) construct and maintain each Coop and Pen such that it is secure from other animals and prevents any rodent from harbouring underneath or within it or within its walls;
(r) not sell any manure or meat derived from the hens;
(s) secure all Hen food that is stored outdoors from vermin and wildlife;
(t) ensure the timely removal of leftover food, debris and manure from each Coop and Pen;
(u) store manure within a fully enclosed structure in a manner that does not generate excessive heat or odour; ensuring that no more than 0.085m3 (3 cubic feet) is stored at a time;
(v) not deposit manure in the District’s sewage or storm drain system. Small quantities of manure may be delivered to an organic food recycling system, where available, or placed in a residential garbage tote and contained within a sealed bag;
(w) not slaughter or euthanize a Hen on the property;
(x) not dispose of a deceased Hen other than by delivering it to a veterinarian, landfill in a sealed bag, a farm, an abattoir, or other facility with the ability to lawfully dispose of the carcass;
(y) not bury a Hen on the property;
(z) follow biosecurity procedures recommended by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and (aa) register the Hens with District of Squamish Animal Control

42

food production;

urban agriculture;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

livestock;

Keeping of Urban Bees (As amended by Bylaw No. 2335, 2014)

The keeping of Beehives is permitted provided that no neighbourhood health, environmental or nuisance problems result. Universities are not restricted to the number of beehives for educational purposes.


43. A person who keeps Urban Bees must:
(a) keep no more than;
(i) two (2) Beehives on any parcel of land under 929 square metres (10,000 square feet) in size despite the number of dwelling units permissible on that parcel;
(ii) four (4) Beehives on any parcel of land over 929 square metres (10,000 square feet) in size and under 1394 square metres (15,000 square metres) in size despite the number of dwelling units permissible on that parcel;
(iii) six (6) Beehives on any parcel of land over 1394 square metres (15,000 square feet) in size despite the number of dwelling units permissible on that parcel;
(b) be a resident of the property where the Bees are kept;
(c) ensure that the Beehives are situated in a back yard only which has a continuous fence that is 1.8 metres in height so as to ensure an appropriate flight path for Bees;
(d) ensure that the Beehives are situated in accordance with the accessory building setbacks identified in the Zoning Bylaw;
(e) ensure that Beehives are situated in such a way that reasonably prevents access by wildlife;
(f) ensure that the Beehives are fully enclosed by electric fencing and situated no less than 1 metre from the electric fencing per the Zoning Bylaw;
(g) ensure that the entrances to the Beehives are facing away from the closest neighbouring property;
(h) maintain the Bees in a condition that reasonably prevents swarming and aggressive behaviour;
(i) ensure that immediate action is taken to end swarming or aggressive behaviour of Bees;
(j) provide sufficient water for the Bees that reasonably prevents them from seeking water on adjacent parcels of land;
(k) post clear, visible signage on the parcel of land warning that bees and electric fencing are present; and
(l) be registered with the apiculture registration system for British Columbia, coordinated by the BC Ministry of Agriculture (BCMA). Under the authority of the Provincial Bee Act, a person must not keep Bees or possess Beehive equipment unless the person is registered.

43

 

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement

Sub-topics: local procurement

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2008

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
food access, sales and procurmeent local procurement;

The District recognizes that purchasing locally can provide an overall benefit to the District. Preferences shall be given in the following order:


a. firstly to businesses located within the District holding
valid business licenses;
b. secondly to businesses located within the Province of
British Columbia;
c. the cost of purchase when acquiring major equipment.
d. thirdly to businesses located in Canada;
e. lastly to any other businesses. 

4.3
       

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: zoning, urban gardens/orchard, urban chickens, beekeeping/apiculture, mobile/street food vending, composting, pollinators, greenhouses, livestock, farm retail/farm gate sales, wildlife and ecosystem management, residential development, irrigation and drainage

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2017

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating

food production;

food sales, access and procurement;

zoning;

composting;

beekeeping/apictulture;

pollinators;

livestock;

farm retail/farmgate sales;

urban gardens/orchard;

residential development;

 

AGRICULTURE, URBAN  means the act of growing food on a lot. In addition to produce grown in a garden, this also includes community gardens, fruit and nut tree production, the keeping of hens and/or bees, and agricultural retail sales limited to 30 m2 in gross floor area and provided that at least 75% of goods for sale are produced on site. Urban agriculture is an accessory use on parcels that are zoned residential. (Bylaw 2303, 2013) 1.3  
urban agriculture; zoning;

The following uses shall be permitted in any zone:...

...(o) urban agriculture;

4.2 (o)  

food production;

urban agriculture;

zoning;

urban gardens/orchard;

composting;

wildlife and ecosystem management;

irrigation and drainage;

URBAN AGRICULTURE (Bylaw 2303, 2013)


(a) The following regulations apply to community gardens
(i) Community garden use shall be authorized in accordance with all relevant District policies and bylaws.
(ii) Community gardens must be serviced by and connected to the municipal water system on the same lot as where the community garden is located.
(iii) Notwithstanding 4.4 (e), accessory buildings and structures for community garden use, including but not limited to storage for materials and tools, a composting facility or greenhouse, are permitted. The siting and size of accessory buildings and structures shall be in accordance with Section 4.4 of this bylaw.
(iv) Raised garden beds shall be set back a minimum of 1.52 metres from all lot lines.
(v) Community garden compost shall only be used for the purpose of composting on-site organics. The compost shall be located in a low foot traffic use location, to ensure limited potential conflict between wildlife and people. Composting and storage shall be in accordance with Section 4.5 of this bylaw.
(vi) Where a lot is developed for a community garden use and where such a lot abuts a residential use, a fence or landscape screening is required as per section 4.6 (Fencing) and 4.7 (Screening) of the Zoning Bylaw.

4.33 (a)  

food production;

urban agriculture;

zoning;

urban chickens;

livestock;

(b) The following regulations apply to coops for the keeping of hens. Coops must be:
(i) No more than 10 m² in floor area;
(ii) No more than 2 m high; 48
(iii) Situated in accordance with the accessory building setbacks identified in Section 4.4;
(iv) No closer than 3 m from any door or window of any dwelling;
(v) Situated in a rear yard only;
(vi) Located at grade level;
(vii) Constructed to prevent access by wildlife and other animals; and
(viii) Surrounded with electric fence, per Fencing Section 4.6.
(c) The following regulations apply to beekeeping. Beehives must be:
(i) Restricted to:
a) No more than 2 beehives on all lots under 929 square metres in size;
b) No more than 4 beehives on all lots over 929 square metres in size and under 1394 square metres in size;
4.33(b)  
urban agriculture;

zoning;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

livestock;

c) No more than 6 beehives on all lots over 1394 square metres in size;
(ii) Situated in accordance with the accessory building setbacks identified in
Section 4.4;
(iii) Situated so as to ensure the flight path of the bees is up over the neighbouring houses in order to minimize the volume of bees at ground
level;
(iv) Positioned so that the beehive entrance faces away from the closest
neighbouring property line;
(v) Located in the rear yard;
(vi) Surrounded with electric fence, per Fencing Section 4.6; and
(vii) Have clear, visible signage on the lot warning that bees are present.
4.33 (c )  
food sales, access and procurement;

zoning;

mobile /street food vending;

PORTABLE FOOD VENDING - CONDITIONS OF USE


Portable Food Vending is permitted to operate:
(a) In any zone that permits a Retail Store, general Retail Sales or Restaurant use; or on other lands for a Special Event with District approval;
(b) Other than on a highway, sidewalk or boulevard providing pedestrian or motor vehicle access;
(c) On parkland or public property with District approval;

4.34  

urban agriculture;

development and     productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;

AGRICULTURAL BUILDINGS


Despite any provision of this Bylaw, where Agriculture is permitted as a principal use, there will be no limit on the number of buildings used for agricultural purposes.

4.36  
  zoning; (h) Notwithstanding any Section of this Bylaw, where agriculture is permitted as a
principal use, there will be no limit on the number or gross floor area of accessory buildings used solely for agricultural purposes. Lot coverage provisions continue to apply to this section. (Bylaw 2434, 2016)
4.4 (h)  
urban agriculture;

zoning;

greenhouses;

(i) Notwithstanding any Section of this Bylaw, greenhouses shall be exempt from
maximum number of buildings, area and gross floor area restrictions and will be
permitted to exceed the maximum lot coverage provisions by an additional 20% of the total lot area. (Bylaw 2434, 2016)
4.4 (i)  
food sales, access and procurement;

zoning;

residential development;

ACCESSORY RETAIL


Accessory retail shall be limited to the selling of agricultural produce and products grown on the lot or another lot operated as part of the same operation not to exceed an area of 92.9 sq. m. 

15.10 and 16.12  

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This Project is made possible with funding from the Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia.