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Japanese Woodblocks of Edo Japan

Japanese Woodblocks of Edo Japan

Vintage woodblock
KPU Richmond
Room 2005

Description:

The Japanese Woodblocks of Edo Japan: Ukiyo-e Production, Themes and Symbols (1700-1885)

Hokusai, Ando Hiroshige, Yoshitoshi Tsukioka – all Japanese woodblock print masters – were part of the great artistic epoch of Edo Japan (1700-1868) or the “Floating World” (Ukiyo-e). Their prints, like the Hokusai’s Great Wave of Kanagawa, Hiroshige’s Kanbara snow, or print series like Yoshitoshi’s 100 Aspects of the Moon, are among Japan’s most famous and recognizable folk art.

This session will introduce the process of woodblock production, some of the key series themes and their cultural importance, as well as a set of the most common folk art symbols embedded in famous Ukiyo-e works. From ghosts to geisha, pine trees, shadows, snow and seascapes, these themes permeate contemporary Japanese art, manga, and anime, and continue to influence contemporary Japanese artistic production.

Back by popular demand! Jack Hayes teaches Asian Studies and History at KPU. His teaching and research focus on late imperial and modern Chinese, Japanese, and Tibetan history. He has given many TALK courses in the past few years.

America/Vancouver Japanese Woodblocks of Edo Japan The Japanese Woodblocks of Edo Japan: Ukiyo-e Production, Themes and Symbols (1700-1885) Hokusai, Ando Hiroshige, Yoshitoshi Tsukioka – all Japanese woodblock print masters – were part of the great artistic epoch of Edo Japan (1700-1868) or the “Floating World” (Ukiyo-e). Their prints, like the Hokusai’s Great Wave of Kanagawa, Hiroshige’s Kanbara snow, or print series like Yoshitoshi’s 100 Aspects of the Moon, are among Japan’s most famous and recognizable folk art. Room 2005 KPU Richmond