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Welcome to the B.C. Food System Policy Database

This database is a centralized resource for planners, policy makers, community advocates, local organizations and the policy curious to search for policy precedents and to better understand how local government policy in B.C. is addressing local food systems. Search by a range of characteristics to find food system policies that have been adopted by local governments across B.C. For more information about using the database and how it was developed see How to use the Database

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Institute for Sustainable Food Systems

Displaying 111 - 120 of 213 Results

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning

Sub-topics: buffer at agricultural edge, livestock, siting and coverage, zoning

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: 2011

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning; buffer at agricultural edge;

 Buffers

1. Any commercial, industrial or residential land use abutting an agricultural zone including land in the ALR shall provide and maintain a buffer on the non-agricultural side of the lot boundary that complies with the requirements of the Agricultural Land Commission’s Landscape Buffer Specifications, ALC 1993.

2. Resource extraction activities as permitted by the relevant agency of the Provincial Government shall require a buffer to be maintained on all lot boundaries, except that where a lot abuts a right of way or easement for public or quasi-public purposes, which is contiguous with a highway, such right of way or easement may be deemed to be within the lot for purposes of establishing the buffer area.

.1 The depth of buffer required in the case of any resource extraction activities as permitted by the relevant agency of the Provincial Government shall be 30 meters [100 ft].

.2 The depth of a buffer required in the case of a landfill shall be 60 meters [200 ft].

3. Within a buffer area:

.1 No building or structure may be erected or placed, except a fence, a wall, or in the case of that part of the buffer area contiguous with the highway, identification signs.

.2 No garbage disposal area and no vehicle parking area shall be located.

.3 Except where danger or a road is involved, no plant material may be removed, nor may any substance of which land is composed be deposited or removed except as part of a recognizable beautification scheme.

.4 The only roads permitted in the buffer areas are those which cross it as close to right angles as practicable and connect directly with the road system contained within the remainder of the lot.

4.20
food production; livestock;

Keeping of Animals

1. The keeping of animals, where permitted, shall be subject to the following regulations:

.1 On any parcel 2.0 ha or less in area, the total number of livestock, must not exceed one (1) animal unit for each 0.2 ha of parcel area;

.2 despite Section 4.31.1, on any parcel 0.4 ha or less in area, the total number of poultry and/or fur bearing animals shall not exceed twenty-five (25).

.3 All structures, pens, runs, enclosures and manure piles shall in addition be located to the satisfaction of the Medical Health Officer in respect of all nearby wells, lakes, streams, springs, groundwater or other bodies of water which in his opinion could suffer contamination therefrom and subject to the regulation of the Waste Management Act.

4.31
development and productive use of agricultural land; siting and coverage; See Agricultural and Rural Resource Zones for siting. section 8

 

Topic: Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: GE/GMO

Region: Capital | Document Type: Other | Year: 2016

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A motion passed by the City of Victoria opposing the cultivation of genetically engineered crops, plants and trees in the City in the absence of scientific testing on the long-term impacts of these crops on human and environmental health. From the City Victoria, Council Member Motion, Council Meeting of August 25, 2016, retrieved November 2016.

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, pollinators, zoning, greenhouses, covenants, livestock, siting and coverage, farm worker accommodation, residential development

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2013

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

beekeeping/apiculture;
pollinators;
livestock;

Hobby Beekeeping Use

Where permitted a Hobby Beekeeping use is subject to the following provisions:

a) A maximum of two (2) hives per property shall be permitted;

b) Bee Hives for a Hobby Beekeeper use shall be located to the rear of the principal building on the lot;

c) Hives must: (i) be raised a minimum of 2.5 metres above grade; or (ii) be behind a solid fence or hedge a minimum of 2.0 metres in height located parallel to an adjacent property line and extending a minimum of 6.0 metres horizontally beyond the hive in either direction. (iii) be oriented with the hive entrance facing towards the centre of the property.

402 (12);
development and productive use of agricultural land; farm worker accommodation;
covenants;
residential development;

(3) An Accessory Employee Residential Use

(a) shall be permitted on a lot with a minimum area of 2 hectares; except where a lot is designated on the Official Community Plan for "Agricultural" or "Rural Residential" use, the minimum lot area shall be 1.7 hectares;

(b) shall be limited to a lot classified as farmland under the Assessment Act;

(c) shall be limited to one accessory employee residential dwelling per lot;

(d) shall not be permitted unless there is registered in the Land Title Office a restrictive covenant in respect of any Accessory Employee Residential dwelling restricting such dwelling to an Accessory Employee Residential use;

(e) the restrictive covenant referred to in this sub-section shall be registered in the Land Title Office with the consent of the registered owner of the lands against which it is charged and in priority to any other encumbrance or charge, save and except any reservation in the original Crown Grant or any Easement, Right-of-way or other restrictive covenant.

502 (3);
food production; livestock; (4) An Agricultural Use that involves the keeping of mink or swine shall not be permitted on a lot of less than 4 hectares. 502 (4)
development and productive use of agricultural land; siting and coverage; See document for siting of buildings and structures in agricultual zones. 503
food production; greenhouses; See document for regulations for Intensive Greenhouse District. 504
development and productive use of agricultural land;   See document for regulations for Agriculture Only Zones. 505

 

Topic: Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: pesticide and pest management

Region: Kitimat-Stikine | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2011

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A bylaw regulating the use of cosmetic pesticides on private and public land.

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Economic Development, Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Food Sales, Access & Procurement

Sub-topics: agri-tourism, ALR, farm retail/farm gate sales, food processing, home occupation/home based businesses, roads in agricultural land, zoning

Region: Islands Trust | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2015

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
economic development;

agri-tourism;

ALR:

Bed and Breakfast home-based businesses are subject to the following additional conditions:

(1) Not more than 1 bed and breakfast home-based business is permitted on any lot. BL461 (05/13)

(2) Despite Subsection 3.13.1, all bedrooms used to accommodate guests must be located only within a principal dwelling unit or within a seasonal cottage, if one is permitted on the lot.

(3) Not more than 3 bedrooms may be used to accommodate guests on lots that are 1.2 ha or less in area; not more than 4 bedrooms may be used to accommodate guests on lots that are greater than 1.2 ha in area.

(4) Despite Subsection 3.13.2, the total floor area dedicated primarily to the accommodation of guests on any lot, including bedrooms, ensuite bathrooms, closets and common areas, is not to exceed 50 per cent of the total floor area of the single-family dwelling and seasonal cottage on the lot, up to a maximum of 100 square metres. Information Note: Under a General Order of the Land Reserve Commission, bed and breakfast home-based businesses within the ALR are restricted to three bedrooms that must be fully contained within a singlefamily dwelling. The use of further bedrooms will require an application to the Commission and its written approval. Salt Spring Island Local Trust Committee 33 July 2015 Land Use Bylaw No. 355 (Consolidated)

(5) Breakfast meals only may be provided to bed and breakfast guests who have been provided with overnight accommodation.

(6) Off-street parking for bed and breakfast home-based business uses must be supplied as outlined in Part 7 and screened from view from abutting lots, highways or parks by a landscape screen.

(7) Despite Section 6.1, signs for bed and breakfast home-based businesses may be indirectly illuminated by a non-flashing light source, external to the sign. Where illumination is provided, it must consist of a maximum 150 watt PAR lamp mounted between 1 and 1.5 meters from each sign face.

3.13.7-3.13.8
development and productive use of agricultural land;

roads in agricultural land;

ALR;

Highways are not to be provided in a manner that results in a physical division of land in the Parks and Reserves 6 or Parks and Reserves 7 zones; or in a manner such that a farm operation would be interrupted in the Agriculture 1 or Agriculture 2 zone, or a forestry operation would be interrupted in the Forestry 1 or Forestry 2 zone. 5.15.2

development and productive use of agricultural land;

processing, storage and distribution;

economic development;

food sales, access and procurement;

food processing;

farm retail/gate sales;

agri-tourism;

home occupation/home based business;

ALR;

See document for related accessory use regulations in Agricultural Zones. 9.1.1
development and productive use of agricultural land;

siting and coverage;

ALR

See document for siting and coverage in Agricultural Zones 9.1.2

 

Topic: Economic Development, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: 'benefit to agriculture' language, agri-tourism, agricultural impact assessment, ALR, ALR subdivision, BC environmental farm plan, farmers' markets, local procurement, protection of farming development permit area, urban containment/growth boundary, wildlife and ecosystem management, zoning

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: 2014

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Topic Sub-Topic  Policy or policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating
wildlife/environmental/pest management;

wildlife and ecosystem management;


BC environmental farm plan;

In recognition of the role that agriculture has on the natural environment and community values, Maple Ridge will work in cooperation with the Agricultural Land Commission to foster and maintain the  agricultural land base. The District will also encourage local farmers to prepare Environmental Farm Plans to enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize potential adverse impacts to the natural environment. 5.17  

food sales, access and procurement;


economic development;;

farmers' markets;


agri-tourism;

local procurement;

Maple Ridge will work cooperatively with senior levels of government and other agencies to promote agricultural business opportunities by:
a) aligning land use bylaws to permit supportive non-farm uses such as   agro-tourism, bed and breakfasts, 
and on-farm sales;
b) assisting agricultural landowners to identify and develop agricultural opportunities (e.g. value added, agri -tourism, bed and breakfast, recreation);
c) identifying and encouraging access by agricultural landowners to agricultural programs;
d) promoting the demand for, and sale of, local agricultural products within the community (e.g. farmer’s  market, on-farm marketing, District food and plant material procurement policies); 
e) developing a small lot agricultural initiative tailored to Maple Ridge conditions.
6-8 *
development and productive use of agricultural land;

urban containment/growth boundary;


ALR;

Maple Ridge will strive to maintain its agricultural land base in Maple Ridge through the following 
mechanisms:
a) supporting the Metro Vancouver Regional Growth Strategy, which includes designated agricultural land;
b) respecting the integrity of the urban area boundary by establishing a distinct separation between rural  and urban designated areas;
c) designating all lands outside of the Urban Area Boundary that are within the ALR as Agriculture in the  Official Community Plan.  Non-farm uses approved by the Agricultural Land Commission and the District  will be permitted on all land designated Agricultural;
d) striving for a balance between farming activity and conservation lands.

 
6-10 *
development and productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;


ALR subdivision;


agricultural impact assessment;


buffer at agricultural edge;


ALR;


'benefit to agriculture' language;

Maple Ridge will protect the productivity of its agricultural land by: 
a) adopting a guiding principle of ”positive benefit to agriculture” when  making land use decisions that could affect the agricultural land base, with favourable recognition of initiatives including but not limited to supportive non-farm uses, infrastructure improvements  for farmland, or the inclusion of land elsewhere in the Agricultural Land Reserve;
b) requiring agricultural impact assessments (AIAs) and Groundwater Impact Assessment of non-farm development and infrastructure projects and identifying measures to off-set impacts on agricultural capability; 
c) preserving larger farm units and areas by using appropriate buffers such as roads, topographic features, watercourses, ditching, fencing, or gradually reduced residential densities on properties adjacent to agricultural land;
d) discouraging the subdivision of agricultural land into smaller parcels, except where positive benefits to  agriculture can be demonstrated;
e) reinforcing the concept that the Agricultural Land Reserve is intended for agricultural use by increasing  the minimum lot size for ALR properties that are zoned Rural Residential;
f) encouraging the amalgamation of smaller parcels of farmland into larger, more cohesive parcels.
6-12 *
urban agriculture;

protection of farming development permit area;


nuisance complaints;

As part of the Agricultural Planning process, Development Permit Area Guidelines for the protection  of farming will be developed to:
a) reduce impacts on farmland and maintain compatibility between farm and non-farm uses; 
b) guide the form and character of future adjacent non-farm development; 
c) place conditions on title to inform non-farming rural residents of normal incidents encountered when  living in an active agricultural area (e.g. noise, odours, crop spraying, traffic).

6-13 *

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning

Sub-topics: amenity density zoning/contributions, buffer at agricultural edge, community kitchen, greenhouses, protection of farming development permit area, urban containment/growth boundary, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Squamish-Lillooet | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: 2012

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food sales, access and procurement;

development and productive use of agricultural land;

food production;

 


 

•  Preserve and facilitate the enhancement of productive farmland;
•  Promote local food production and sales;
•  Accommodate community supported agricultural opportunities and land uses; and
•  Support a wide range of agricultural practices and preserve land to build local food protection capacity.
 
5.8.1;
development and productive use of agricultural land; urban containment/growth boundary; The lands within the UGB (Urban Growth Boundary) contain areas that are designated
for urban growth. A fundamental aspect of this policy is the preservation of agriculturally designated lands. Further the criterion contained within Schedule A further emphasizes the importance of protecting and enhancing agricultural lands.
5.8.2.1;
urban agriculture; urban gardens/orchard;
greenhouses;
The Village supports the inclusion of community gardens and greenhouses to encourage residents to grow their own food. 5.8.2.6;

urban agriculture;

economic developtment and agri-tourism;

amenity density zoning/contributions;


greenhouses;


community kitchen;

Agri-tourism amenities including a downtown multiuse public facility and community greenhouses, and community kitchens among eligible contributions for desnity bonusing. See document for details. Schedule B;
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

protection of farming development permit area;


buffer at agricultural edge;

Development Permit Area No. 3 - Enhancement of Agriculture A Development Permit is required for areas which are hereby established and designated as DPA#3 within Map C for the purpose of the protection of farming as permitted in accordance with Section 919.1(1) (c) of the Local Government Act. See document for details.. 7.3

Topic: Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban farm, partnerships/advocacy/liaising, residential development, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Food Strategy | Year: 2012

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

Language

Rating

urban agriculture;

 

The City of North Vancouver supports and encourages citizens to engage in urban agriculture on public and private land .See document for related actions.

1; 8
urban agriculture; urban farm; The City of North Vancouver encourages not-for-profit organizations to propose non-commercial, community engaging Urban Farms on public land. See document for related actions.  2; *
urban agriculture;

urban gardens/orchard;


residential development;

As the City increases in density, The City of North Vancouver provides opportunities for more food production space within medium and high density developments. See document for related actions.  3; *
  partnerships/advocacy/liaising; The City of North Vancouver supports local Community Groups which seek to address food security solutions for our City. See document for related actions. 4; *

 

Topic: Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning, Water Management, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: amenity density zoning/contributions, buffer at agricultural edge, commercial development, covenants, farmland trust, food processing, food storage, irrigation and drainage, residential development, stormwater management, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Islands Trust | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: consolidated 2015

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

buffer at agricultural edge;

covenants;

Where the property being subdivided or developed adjoins agricultural land, a vegetated buffer is to be planted or retained. The buffer should usually be at least 3 m wide and should be consistent with the Landscaped Buffer Guidelines (ALC, 1993) developed by the Agricultural Land Commission. The buffer area should be protected from disturbance by a covenant. E.1.7.22 *

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

water management;

stormwater management;

irrigation and drainage;

commercial development;

institutional development;

residential development;

New commercial, industrial, institutional and multi-family residential developments that will create more than 280 m2 of new impervious surfacing should include a report prepared by a Professional Engineer that determines the extent of changes to the natural drainage. It should identify any conditions that should be incorporated into the development permit to protect property from flooding, erosion or from other undesirable impacts as the result of changes to stormwater runoff. Particular attention should be paid to ensuring that drainage changes will not result in detrimental impacts such as flooding or reduced groundwater availability on agricultural lands or watercourses that either adjoin the development or are located in the same watershed. E.1.10.2 Developments that would create less than 280 m2 of impervious surface area should not alter drainage in a way that would cause detrimental impacts on other properties, including agricultural land. The Local Trust Committee could request that a drainage plan be prepared by a Professional Engineer to assist it in establishing development permit conditions related to drainage, E.1.10.1 *
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning; buffer at agricultural edge; Developments adjoining agricultural lands should be designed to minimize conflicts with that land. The location of access roads, the siting of structures and the layout of subdivisions should follow the guidelines developed by the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands and the Agricultural Land Commission as a guide to implementing the Farm Practices Protection (Right to Farm) Act (MAFF, 1996). Site designs should allow for a vegetated buffer, as outlined in Guideline E.2.8.7. E.2.8.7 Where the property being subdivided or developed adjoins agricultural land, a vegetated buffer is to be planted or retained. The buffer should usually be at least 3 m wide and should be consistent with the Landscaped Buffer Guidelines (ALC, 1993) developed by the Agricultural Land Commission. The buffer area should be protected from disturbance by a covenant.  E.2.4.5  

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

water management;

wildlife/environmental/pest management;

wildlife and ecosystem management;

Development should not result in the pollution of surface or groundwater supplies. Particular care should be taken to ensure that there are no detrimental impacts on agricultural land or fishbearing watercourses because of water pollution.  E.2.12.3 *
food processing, storage and distribution;

amenity density zoning/contributions;

food processing;

food storage;

urban gardens/orchard;

farmland trust;

The Local Trust Committee could consider Amenity Zoning applications that would provide the following eligible community amenities: (Note: the amenities within this list are not in order of priority)...

...e. land for community-owned farmland or land for community agricultural processing or storage facilities provided to the Salt Spring Farmers' Institute or a community farmland trust organization.

H.3.2.1 (e )  

 

Supplementary Information

Municipal Planner Interview with Salt Spring Island Re: Amenity Zoning Provisions for Community Owned Farmland and Community Storage/Processing Facilities

Amenity Zoning is the granting of additional development potential (such as an increase in density beyond existing zoning regulations, or a subdivision of a property) in exchange for the voluntary provision of a community amenity by the land owner.  Among its list of eligible amenity contributions, Salt Spring Island Local Trust Committee includes the donation of land for community-owned farmland or agricultural processing/storage facilities.

Policy Development and Public Consultation

For quite some time, the Salt Springs Island OCP has permitted the donation of farmland and land for agricultural processing/storage facilities as eligible contributions in exchange for increased development potential. Similar policies are present in both Salt Spring Island’s current OCP (adopted in 2008), and the previous, now repealed, OCP adopted in 1998.

During the 2008 OCP review process, staff prepared opportunities for the community to provide input on specific topics, including amenity zoning. To gather feedback on this particular topic, public meetings and six focus groups were held during the OCP review and development process. Two staff reports were drafted to summarize recommendations to improve the Amenity Zoning policies and help inform their review and improvement.  (see LPSa and LPSb )

Policy Adoption

As a result of staff, council and community discussion during the latest OCP review, the Amenity Zoning provisions were updated to provide the Local Trust Committee with more guidance as to how to employ the policies. These revisions include a list of factors that the Local Trust Committee should consider in order assess the appropriateness of the land for the increased density prior to approving any applications for amenity zoning. Examples of these considerations include the proximity of the site and the proposed development to areas with high environmental value, to areas subject to erosion/flooding and to existing roads and services.  

Policy Implementation and Outcomes

Amenity zoning is employed as a discretionary tool and considered on a case-by-case basis.  Since density increases on Salt Spring Island can be limited by other factors (eg. moratoriums on increases in water demand), there have been few successful development proposals to increase density on the Island. Additionally, other amenities (e.g. affordable housing) can be viewed as more attractive contributions by applicants.

To date, this policy has been successfully implemented once. In this instance, 60 acres of agricultural land in the Fulford Valley (an agricultural area) was donated to the Salt Spring Island Farmers’ Institute for the establishment of a community farmland trust. This donation was made in exchange for an increase in density for a development in Fulford Harbour. The donated land is now home to the Burgoyne Valley Community Farm, which includes six farming operations, a community garden, and a community services plot where food is produced for people who would not otherwise have access to local produce. This is cited as an excellent example of how amenity zoning provisions can benefit the agricultural community.

Policy Recommendations

Presently, amenity zoning is the granting of additional development density by the Local Trust Committee in exchange for the voluntary provision of a community amenity by the land owner. It was suggested that the Amenity Zoning policies could be applied to re-zoning requests in addition to their current application to request for increased density. In this way, rezoning applications which do not request and increase in development potential, but instead request a change in land use, could offer community amenities in exchange for granting a request to rezone land. By applying Amenity Zoning to rezoning applications, regardless of whether or not the rezoning application was for an increase in density, Salt Spring’s Local Trust Committee could help achieve its goal of increasing community amenities on the Island.

Related Policies and Processes

The Agricultural Land Reserve application referral process has also resulted in the provision of amenities to support the agricultural community on Salt Spring Island.

For example, the Produce Center, a community food storage/processing facility currently being designed/developed, resulted from an application to exclude land from the Agricultural Land Reserve. Negotiations between the developer, the Islands Trust, the Agricultural Land Commission and the agricultural community resulted in an agreement that the developer facilitate the creation of the Produce Centre as part of the conditions for granting the ALR exclusion.  Such a facility, identified in Salt Spring’s Area Farm Plan, is considered a significant contribution in supporting the viability of the local agricultural community by increasing the Island’s storage, handling and distribution capacity for locally produced foods.

Note:  Recommendations included in the Salt Spring Area Farm Plan, adopted in 2008, played a key role in informing agricultural policies included in the OCP, such as the Amenity Zoning described here. Please see Salt Spring Island Farm Area Plan for more details.

 

References

LPSa, Local Planning Services, Staff Report Amenity Zoning and Density Transfer provisions of Salt Spring Island Official Community Plan, presented to Salt Spring Island Local Trust Committee. March 20th, 2008.

LPSb, Local Planning Services, Staff Re OCP Review- April Draft, presented to Salt Spring Island Local Trust Committee. May 5th, 2008.

LPSc, Local Planning Services, Salt Spring Island Trust, personal communication, October 2016.

Salt Spring Area Farm Plan, http://plantofarm.org/who-we-are/area-farm-plan/, retrieved November 2016

Salt Spring Island Farmland Trust, http://www.ssifarmlandtrust.org/, retrieved December 2016

 

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Economic Development, Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Food Production, Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning, Waste Management, Water Management, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: 'benefit to agriculture' language, agri-tourism, agricultural advisory committee, ALR, ALR exclusion, ALR subdivision, amenity density zoning/contributions, buffer at agricultural edge, climate change and greenhouse gases, commercial development, crops, demonstration farm, farm worker accommodation, farmers' markets, food processing, food storage, GE/GMO, irrigation and drainage, livestock, research and data collection, residential development, roads in agricultural land, seeds, transfer of development potential, wildlife and ecosystem management, zoning

Region: Islands Trust | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: consolidated 2015

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating
wildlife/environmental/pest management; climate change and greenhouse gases; The Local Trust Committee should support local food production as a significant factor in reducing food transportation costs and greenhouse gas emissions. A.6.2.15  
policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

zoning;

agricultural advisory committee;

agricultural-government liaising;

The Local Trust Committee should maintain an Agricultural Advisory Committee to:
a. provide community advice about bylaw changes, applications for rezoning or subdivision, and applications to the Agricultural Land Commission. b. help in developing and interpreting local policies about farming. c. identify other ways that the Local Trust Committee can encourage and support farming in the community.
B.6.2.2.1  

food processing,storage and distribution;

development and productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;

food processing;

food storage;

ALR;

The Local Trust Committee will not make changes to local bylaws to prohibit or restrict farming in the Agricultural Land Reserve or in areas where farming is now allowed, or that are obstacles to the creation of local abattoirs, cold storage facilities, or other facilities that would improve local food security. B.6.2.2.6 *

food processing,storage and distribution;

food sales, access and procurement;

food production;

economic development;

zoning;

farmers' markets;

food processing;

food storage;

farm worker accommodation;

ALR;

residential development;

agri-tourism;

agricultural advisory committee;

research and data collection;

livestock;

On the advice of the Agricultural Advisory Committee, the Local Trust Committee should continue to support local farming by:
a. addressing the need for additional housing on agricultural land.
b. permitting appropriate farm uses as defined by the Agricultural Land Reserve Act and Regulations.
c. recognizing the traditional uses of the property owned by the Salt Spring Island Farmer's
Institute on Rainbow Road.
d. allowing for the processing and warehousing of island farm products on the Institute's
property.
e. supporting zoning that would allow various forms of community farming activities.
f. supporting the development of farmers' markets.
g. considering changes to the Land Use Bylaw, based on the objectives of the Area Farm Plan
and in consultation with the Agricultural Land Commission and the Ministry of Agriculture and
Lands, to permit additional dwellings for farm workers.
h. considering changes to the Land Use Bylaw to further support agri-tourism.
i. supporting all efforts to ensure a viable local livestock industry.
j. updating agricultural information, monitoring changes in the agricultural sector and helping to
identify unused or available farmland.
B.6.2.2.7 *
development and productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;

ALR subdivision;

ALR;

 'benefit to agriculture' language;

The minimum average size of lots that can be created by subdivision in the Agriculture and Watershed-Agriculture Designation will remain the same as permitted by existing zoning. The Local Trust Committee could consider amending the minimum size of individual lots, if such a change would benefit local farming or protect agricultural land by allowing clustered development. Background Note: The minimum parcel sizes and minimum average parcel sizes outlined in the Land Use Bylaw apply only when land is:
a. excluded from the Agricultural Land Reserve, or
b. approved for subdivision by the Agricultural Land Commission. An exception to the minimum lot sizes can be made where a home site is being created for a relative as outlined in Section 946 of the Local Government Act. Such subdivisions must also be approved by the Agricultural Land Commission.
B.6.2.2.8 *

food processing, storage and distribution;

economic development;

waste management;

zoning;

food processing;

demonstration farm;

agri-tourism;

ALR;

The Local Trust Committee could consider changing zoning to permit the following land uses, where permitted by the Agricultural Land Reserve Act or regulations, on individual properties in the Agriculture Designation: small-scale processing and sales of island-grown forest products; farming schools; farm-based tourist accommodation; waste management facilities. Such uses should only be allowed where farming capability is minimal and the planned use would not interfere with land productivity. Preference should be given to proposals that would improve the viability of an existing farm operation. B.6.2.2.9  
development and productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;

transfer of development potential;

The Local Trust Committee should consider rezoning applications from property owners with productive agricultural land outside the Agricultural Land Reserve who wish to transfer their development potential to maintain their farm. Such Land could be considered a Development Potential Donor Area, despite the development potential transfer status of the Designation it is in. Such applications should follow the guidelines in Appendix 4.  B.6.2.2.10  
food processing, storage and distribution;

zoning;

food processing;

food storage;

amenity density zoning/contributions;

The Local Trust Committee could consider rezoning applications to allow higher density in exchange for community owned farmland or land for community farm product processing or storage facilities. Such applications should follow the guidelines in Appendix 3. Such land is an
eligible community amenity, which could be exchanged for a higher density of development as outlined in Appendix 3.
B.6.2.2.11  
development and productive use of agricultural land; ALR; The Local Trust Committee will support the inclusion of agricultural land within the Agricultural Land Reserve.
 
B.6.2.2.12 *
development and productive use of agricultural land; ALr subdivision;  The Local Trust Committee could support applications to the Agricultural Land Commission to subdivide land within the Agricultural Land Reserve if:
a. the subdivision results in improved farming capability or production on all proposed lots in a way that would be impossible without subdivision.
b. the subdivision is to provide a house site up to 0.6 ha in size for an adult relative of the property owner, as defined by Section 946 of the Local Government Act and the parcel was held by that owner (or a blood relation) before the adoption of the Agricultural Land Commission Act on December 21,1972.
c. the subdivision is clearly in the public interest consistent with other objectives of this Plan
B.6.2.2.13  
development and productive use of agricultural land; roads in agricultural land; The Local Trust Committee should only support the use of lands in the Agriculture or Watershed Agriculture Designations for road access to other lands if the proposed road does not interfere with farming capability.  B.6.2.2.14 *
development and productive use of agricultural land;

ALR exclusion;

ALR;

'benefit to agriculture' language;

The Local Trust Committee could support applications to the Agricultural Land Commission for non-farm use or exclusion of land within the Agricultural Land Reserve in some situations where local farming or the greater community would benefit. Support for such applications should only be considered if the application has been referred to the Agricultural Advisory Committee and falls into one of the following categories:
a. the proposed non-farm use or exclusion would allow an active farm to diversify and broaden its income, but not decrease the farming capability of the property.
b. the proposed non-farm use or exclusion is consistent with local zoning or a land use designation or policy in this Plan, including policies B.3.3.2.10 and B.7.2.2.7.
c. in the instance of a proposed exclusion, the Local Trust Committee may consider an application that would result in inclusion of existing non-ALR farmland into the ALR.
d. the non-farm use or exclusion of property for essential community services, if the location of the service is limited by engineering constraints, or by strategic considerations such as those that determine the best location for an emergency response station, and the proponent has demonstrated that there is no suitable alternate, non-ALR property. Background Note: This policy suggests the types of applications to the Agricultural Land Commission which could be supported by the Local Trust Committee. However, the final decision regarding all such applications rests with the Commission.]
B.6.2.2.15  
water management;

zoning;

irrigation and drainage;

agricultural advisory committee;

agricultural-government liaising;

When it considers rezoning applications that are not related to farming, the Local Trust Committee will ensure the availability of water for farming would not be reduced because of a zoning change. If a rezoning application would result in an increase in water use, the Local Trust Committee will ask the Agricultural Advisory Committee for advice about the potential impacts on farming. B.6.2.2.16  

water management;

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

stormwater management;

The Local Trust Committee encourages subdivision layouts that reduce the potential for conflict with farming. When subdivisions are proposed for land that drains towards agricultural lands, the staff shall request that the Subdivision Approving Officer consider how changes to natural drainage patterns could affect agricultural activities. Such applications may be referred to the Agricultural Advisory Committee for advice and the Advisory Committee's suggestions for the protection of farming operations will be forwarded to the Subdivision Approving Officer for consideration.
 
B.6.2.2.17  

water management;

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

zoning;

stormwater management;

buffer at agricultural edge;

When it considers rezoning applications for land that borders or drains into agricultural land, the Local Trust Committee will ensure that zoning changes are not made in a way that would have a negative effect on farming. For example, the Committee could require that a vegetation buffer be maintained on land that is being rezoned next to farm land, if the proposed use could result in conflicts with a farming operation. The Committee should also ensure that a zoning change would not result in detrimental changes to natural drainage or pollution of water supplies. The Agricultural Advisory Committee will be asked for advice about rezoning applications on land that borders or drains into agricultural land. B.6.2.2.18 8
development and productive use of agricultural land;

zoning;

commercial development;

institutional development;

residential development;

Zoning changes should not be made to allow large new multi-family, industrial, institutional or commercial developments in the Agriculture or Watershed-Agriculture Designation. An exception could be considered for community facilities or limited industrial zoning that would provide broad
benefits to the community and are specifically mentioned in this Plan.
B.6.2.2.19 *

food production;

GE/GMO;

seeds;

crops;

The Local Trust Committee will support efforts to discourage the use of genetically engineered seeds or plants for locally grown products B.6.2.2.30  
water management;

zoning;

irrigation and drainage;

wildlife and ecosystem management;

 

When considering rezoning applications, the Local Trust Committee should consider the impacts of the proposed new use on existing wells, springs, or other water supplies. If the proposed use is expected to need more water than the uses already allowed on the property, then the Committee should ask for evidence that wells or other water supplies in the neighbourhood would not be depleted. The Committee should also consider whether water use would affect agricultural activities or deplete any springs necessary to maintain fish habitat. Should a zoning change be proposed where groundwater supplies are not adequate, the applicant could be encouraged to find other means of supplying water. Rainwater catchment or a water conservation program could be considered. C.3.3.2.2