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Welcome to the B.C. Food System Policy Database

This database is a centralized resource for planners, policy makers, community advocates, local organizations and the policy curious to search for policy precedents and to better understand how local government policy in B.C. is addressing local food systems. Search by a range of characteristics to find food system policies that have been adopted by local governments across B.C. For more information about using the database and how it was developed see How to use the Database

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4) After applying your search criteria, you can use CTRL + F on your keyboard to easily find topics/subtopics of interest within a given policy document.

 

 

 


Institute for Sustainable Food Systems

Displaying 161 - 170 of 213 Results

Topic:

Sub-topics: urban gardens/orchard

Region: Capital | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2003

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The District of Saanich endorses the following goals in its Community Gardens Policy:
 support the establishment of one community garden for each neighbourhood (local area)
 recognize the need for community gardens as parks are being acquired or redeveloped. The document continues describes guidelines for community gardens on municipal land, guidelines for selecting new sites and retaining existing sites and avenues in which the Municipality will support community gardens.

See document for full text and details.

Topic: Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban farm

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Guideline | Year: 2016

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These guidelines have been prepared to assist the development of safe, neighbourly and productive urban farms and create a more sustainable food system for Vancouver. Urban farming will improve the resilience of Vancouver’s food systems in accordance with the vision, principles and goals defined in the Vancouver Food Strategy and the Greenest City Action Plan which calls for an increase of urban farms to improve economic, social and environmental objectives. The guidelines are to be used in conjunction with the Zoning and Development By-law and the License By-law.


The purpose of the guidelines is to assist both urban farm applicants to apply as well as City staff to evaluate applications by:
(a) Providing details on suitability of urban farms in Vancouver; and
(b) Ensuring that urban farms meet City policy and regulations. from Urban farm Guidelines, City of Vancouver  http://vancouver.ca/people-programs/growing-food-for-sale.aspx

 

From City of Vancouver Urban Farm Guidelines, 2016

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban farm, zoning, farm retail/farm gate sales, farmers' markets

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
food sales, access and procurement farmers' markets;

Farmers’ Market

11.21.1 A Farmers’ Market must be in: (a) open air stalls or booths; (b) stalls or booths partially or totally covered by tents or similar temporary structures; and (c) stalls or booths in a building approved for use as a Farmers’ Market.

11.21.2 A Farmers’ Market must have at least 11 stalls or booths, except that the Director of Planning may permit a lesser number of stalls or booths, if the Director of Planning first considers all applicable policies and guidelines adopted by Council.

11.21.3 The site area of a Farmers’ Market must not exceed 2 323 m2 , except that the Director of Planning may permit an increase in site area, if the Director of Planning first considers all applicable policies and guidelines adopted by Council.

11.21.4 A vendor at a Farmers’ Market must only sell: local fresh, dried or frozen fruit and vegetables; local dried or frozen meat and seafood; local eggs; local dairy products; local plants; local prepared foods; local ready-to-eat foods; local artisan crafts; or local wine, cider, beer or spirits.

11.21.5 No more than 40% of the total number of stalls or booths in a Farmers’ Market may be used for the sale of local ready-to-eat foods and local artisan crafts.

11.21.6 There must be no more than three vendors selling or providing samples of local wine, cider, beer or spirits at a Farmers’ Market.

11.21

urban agriculture;

urban farm;

Urban Farm - Class A

Notwithstanding anything else in this By-law, Urban Farm - Class A is subject to the following:

11.29.1 The planting area must not exceed 325 m2 on any single parcel unless the primary use of the parcel is Park or Institutional in which case the Director of Planning may permit an increase in planting area to a maximum of 7 000 m2 .

11.29.2 If two or more parcels are operated jointly as an Urban Farm - Class A, the combined planting area for all parcels must not exceed 7 000 m2 .

11.29.3 No on-site processing of fruits and vegetables, or manufacturing of food products is permitted.

11.29.4 No mechanical equipment may be used other than that designed for household use including lawnmowers, rototillers, garden hoses and pruners.

11.29.5 No herbicides or pesticides are permitted.

11.29.6 No on-site sales are permitted, unless the primary use of the parcel is Institutional.

11.29.7 No Urban Farm - Class A operated on a single parcel may generate revenue exceeding $9,999 in any calendar year, unless the primary use of the parcel is Park or Institutional.

11.29.8 If an Urban Farm - Class A is operated, in whole or in part, by a person other than an owner or full-time resident of the parcel, the planting area must be subject to a lease authorizing the operation of the farm.

11.29.9 No offensive noise, odour, light, smoke, or vibration or other objectionable effect may be produced.

11.29.10 No mechanical equipment may be stored outside.

11.29.11 Any development permit or waiver of a development permit for an Urban Form-Class A is time limited to 1 year.

Urban Farm - Class B

Notwithstanding anything else in this By-law, Urban Farm – Class B is subject to the following:

11.30.1 The planting area for a single parcel or the combined planting area for all parcels operated jointly as an Urban Farm – Class B, may not exceed 7 000 m2 , unless relaxed by the Director of Planning due to unnecessary hardship associated with the location, shape or size of the parcel or parcels.

11.30.2 If located within 30 m of a residential use, no mechanical equipment may be used other than that designed for household use including lawnmowers, rototillers, garden hoses and pruners.

11.30.3 No herbicides or pesticides are permitted.

11.30.4 No offensive noise, odour, light, smoke, or vibration or other objectionable effect may be produced.

11.30.5 If an Urban Farm - Class B is operated, in whole or in part, by a person other than an owner or full-time resident of the parcel during the farm operation, the planting area must be subject to a lease authorizing the operation of the farm.

11.30.6 Any development permit for an Urban Farm Class B is time limited to 1 year

section 11, 11.29- 11,30

 

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: amenity density zoning/contributions, community kitchen, edible landscaping, farmers' markets, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2010

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A policy requiring development proposals for large developments put forward through rezoning application to create defined plans or studies on the following:
1. Sustainable Site Design
2. Access to Nature
3. Sustainable Food Systems
4. Green Mobility
5. Rainwater Management
6. Zero Waste Planning
7. Affordable Housing
8. Low Carbon Energy Supply.

from City of Vancouver Rezoning Policy for Sustainable Large Developments, 2010, accessed Oct 2016

 

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban farm

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
urban agriculture; urban farm;

URBAN FARMING

(1) Every parcel operated as an Urban Farm ― Class A or Urban Farm ― Class B or as part of an Urban Farm ― Class A or Urban Farm ― Class B, requires a separate business license.

(2) An Urban Farm - Class A or Urban Farm - Class B may only operate on more than one parcel if all the licenses are issued to the same person.

(3) A licence holder may not operate an Urban Farm – Class A that exceeds a combined planting area of 7,000m2 .

(4) A licence holder may not operate an Urban Farm – Class B that exceeds a combined planting area of 7,000m2 , unless approved under section 11.30.1 of the Zoning and Development By-law.

(5) No activities associated with an Urban Farm – Class A may take place outside the hours of 8 am to 9 pm.

(6) If located within 30 m of a residential use, no activities associated with an Urban Farm – Class B may be carried on outside the hours of 8am to 9 pm.

(7) If the holder of a license for an Urban Farm – Class A or an Urban Farm – Class B applies for farm class tax status under the BC Assessment Act, the applicant must inform the Chief License Inspector at the time the application is made.

(8) If part of the planting area of an Urban Farm – Class A or Urban Farm – Class B is subject to a lease, the lease must be provided to the City License Inspector

26.4 

 

Topic: Economic Development, Education, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Urban Agriculture, Waste Management, Water Management, Wildlife/Environmental/Pest Management

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, climate change and greenhouse gases, commercial development, community food system education, composting, edible landscaping, emergency preparedness, farmers' markets, farmland trust, food processing, food recovery/gleaning/donation, greenhouses, grocery stores, home occupation/home based businesses, livestock, local food culture, mobile/street food vending, partnerships/advocacy/liaising, pilot project, pollinators, research and data collection, residential development, stormwater management, urban chickens, urban farm, urban gardens/orchard, wildlife and ecosystem management, zoning

Region: Capital | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: 2012

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating

urban agriculture;

food production;

zoning;

urban gardens/orchard;

Parks, schools, public facilities and utilities, public assembly, community services, pathways, open space, urban food production,institutional, and recreational uses are permitted in all designations as determined in accordance with zoning. 6.4; *

urban agriculture;

water management;

food production;

urban gardens/orchard;

stormwater management;

pilot project;

[Implement the City’s Greenways Plan as shown in Map 6, seeking opportunities to enhance recreational opportunities, identity, green features and the pedestrian and cycling experience by]...

...Piloting green infrastructure and urban food production in greenways

9.7.3 *

food production;

food processing, storage and distribution;

food access, sales and procurement;

nutrition and public health;

economic development;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

food processing;

wildlife and ecosystem management;

local food culture;

Participate in coordinated community and regional efforts to develop a more sustainable food system that considers all stages of the food system as shown in Figure 18, and that:

17.1.1 Contributes to the economic development, environmental management, and social well-being of Victoria and the region;

17.1.2 Encourages local and regional food production and processing, and protection of productive farmland;

17.1.3 Recognizes access to safe, sufficient, culturally appropriate and nutritious food as a basic need for all citizens;

and,17.1.4 Celebrates local food culture, cuisine, and indigenous and local food traditions.

17.1; *
policy partnerships, advocacy and development   Assess neighbourhood food system features and needs as part of local area planning. 17.3;  

urban agriculture;

food production;

urban gardens/orchard;

edible landscaping;

Review and develop City policy to increase the number of allotment gardens, commons gardens, edible landscapes, food-bearing trees and other types of food production activities that considers other uses and identifies:

17.4.1 The land types and potential City-held sites where different food production activities might be supported;

17.4.2 The roles and responsibilities of participants; 

17.4.3 Mechanisms to encourage and support food production sites on City-held lands, other publicly-held lands, and on private lands;

and 17.4.4 Mechanisms to acquire land for food production purposes, where appropriate.

17.4; *

urban agriculture;

food production;

urban gardens/orchard; Encourage food production activities in visible and suitable public places to foster a connection between people and the process of growing, harvesting and eating fresh produce.  17.5; *

urban agriculture;

wildlife/environmental/pest management;

food production;

urban gardens/orchard; Include urban food production objectives in the development of management strategies to address pests, disease, invasive species, urban wildlife and other ecological issues on public and private lands. 17.6; *
urban agriculture; urban gardens/orchard; Support the establishment of at least one allotment garden per neighbourhood, co-located with community facilities or services where possible, and more in neighbourhoods that feature a high proportion of rental or attached housing, where feasible. 17.7; *
urban agriculture;

urban gardens/orchard;

pilot project;

Work with community groups to develop pilot projects for the planting, maintenance and harvesting of food-bearing trees on suitable City-held lands. 17.8; *

food production;

urban agriculture;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising; Consider new and innovative approaches to urban food production that increase food security, in partnership with citizens, community groups and other stakeholders. 17.9;  

food production;

urban agriculture;

urban gardens/orchard;

Support food production on private land where it is safe, suitable and compatible with the Urban Place Guidelines in this plan. 17.10;  

urban agriculture;

food production;

urban gardens/orchard;

residential development;

Encourage the provision of gardens and other food production spaces for the use of residents in new multi-unit housing. 17.11; *
food production;

urban chickens;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

livestock;

Support the keeping of small livestock in the city by:

17.13.1 Maintaining regulatory support for the keeping of poultry and honeybees;

and,17.13.2 Reviewing regulations to consider the keeping of other small livestock for food production, appropriate to an urban environment, in collaboration with senior levels of government and the health authority.

17.13; *
urban agriculture;

zoning;

urban farm;

urban farm;home occupations/ home-based business;

commercial development;

institutional development;

residential development;

greenhouses;

Explore expanded small-scale commercial urban agriculture through a review of policy and regulations to consider the opportunities for, and implications of:

17.14.1 Enabling infrastructure and human resources needed to support small-scale commercial urban agriculture as a home occupation;

17.14.2 Using residential accessory buildings for commercial agricultural purposes; and, 17.14.3 Allowing commercial urban agriculture uses, including greenhouses, in commercial and industrial zones.

17.14; *
food sales, access and procurement; grocery stores; Support the achievement of residential densities sufficient to support food stores and other food retail uses such as bakeries, restaurants and pubs, in town centres and large urban villages. 17.15;  
food sales, access and procurement; mobile/street food vending Explore expanded street food vending opportunities to animate the public realm and showcase local cuisine, through the review of existing regulations and the development of a program in partnership with local businesses and the health authority. 17.16; *
food sales, access and procurement; farmers' markets;  Encourage the development of farmers markets in Town Centres and Urban Villages, and a viable year-round farmers market in the Downtown Core Area, to animate the public and private realm and support local growers and food processors. 17.17;  

waste management;

urban agriculture;

food production;

food processing, storage and distribution;

pilot project;

food processing;

food recovery/gleaning/donation;

Pilot new uses in appropriate locations that enhance urban food production, processing and food waste recycling. 17.18; *
food processing, storage and distribution;

food processing;

farmland trust;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

Work with neighbouring municipalities, the Capital Regional District, the provincial government and other food system stakeholders to increase the regional food supply by:

17.19.1 Establishing policies, tools and initiatives to protect and expand working farmland, such as a regional farmland trust; and,

17.19.2 Implementing strategies to support and re-establish key food system infrastructure such as meat, fruit and vegetable processing facilities. 

17.19; *

nutrition and public health;

food sales, access and procurement;

community food system education; Support the efforts of community centres, community organizations, the health authority, the school district, senior government and the private sector to establish programs and resources that build knowledge and skills to help people move towards healthier, and more secure and dignified access to nutritious food. 17.21; *
food sales, access and procurement;

emergency preparedness;

research and data collection;

Identify short and long-term food supply and infrastructure needs as part of a critical infrastructure assessment in City emergency preparedness planning.  17.22; *
policy planning, partnerships, advocacy and development;

emergency preparedness;

climate change and greenhouse gases;

Work with regional partners to enhance the capacity of the regional food system to adapt to climate change impacts, including water shortages, extreme weather events and fluctuations in global food and energy prices. 17.23; *
waste management; food recovery/gleaning/donation; Support the efforts of community organizations and the private sector to establish initiatives that divert recoverable food from the pre-waste stream for redistribution to local food security organizations. 17.25; *
waste management;

composting;

commercial development;

residential development;

Encourage the Capital Regional District to undertake a regionally coordinated approach to the recycling of food waste that retains biological nutrients regionally by:

17.26.1 Promoting household composting systems;

17.26.2 Establishing a household organic waste collection program with opportunities for finished compost to be made available for farmers and other food producers within the region;

and,17.26.3 Developing strategies to encourage organic waste diversion from multi-unit housing and commercial properties.

17.26; *

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, farm retail/farm gate sales, pollinators, urban chickens, urban farm, zoning

Region: Capital | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: 2016

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A zoning bylaw amendment to regulate small-scale commercial urban food production.

 

Supplementary Information

 

Food System Coordinator Interview with the City of Victoria Re: Small-Scale Commercial Urban Food Production

Small-scale commercial urban food production has been included as a permitted land use in the most recent revision of Victoria’s Zoning Regulation Bylaw.

Policy Development, Public Consultation, and Policy Adoption

The City of Victoria’s OCP (Chapter 17: Food Systems) and the City of Victoria’s 2015-2018 Strategic Plan spurred the development of policies and programs to increase urban food production. Goal 8 of the Strategic Plan (“Enhance and Steward Public Spaces, Green Spaces and Food Systems”) called for a city-wide consultation to identify tangible projects and bylaw changes that could enhance the urban food system. This gave City staff the mandate to hold a community consultation process called “Growing in the City” in 2015-2016.

 The year-long consultation culminated in the presentation of two reports to Council. The first focused on community food production on public lands, such as community/boulevard gardens, edible landscaping etc. The second, which discussed commercial urban food production suggested several bylaw revisions to accommodate small-scale commercial urban food production.

Overall, to better support small-scale commercial urban food production as part of the "Growing in the City" project, the Zoning Regulation Bylaw, Business Licence Bylaw, Sign Bylaw, Pesticide Use Reduction Bylaw, Streets and Traffic Bylaw, and Official Community Plan, were amended to:

  • Define small-scale commercial urban food production (includes the production of fruits, vegetables, flowers, fibre, seeds, nuts, seedlings, herbs, eggs and honey);
  • Allow small-scale commercial urban food production in all zones;
  • Restrict loadings of delivery trucks;
  • Allow off-site retail sales;
  • Allow on-site retail sales through food stands;
  • Limit odours, noise and light pollution;
  • Exempt rooftop greenhouses from height calculations and floor space ratio calculations;
  • Exempt small-scale commercial urban food production from requiring a development permit for landscaping;
  • Allow permanent farmers market signage;
  • Allow boulevard gardening;
  • Prohibit pesticide uses which constitute noxious or offensive business practices within the context of small-scale commercial urban food production;

As part of these changes, small-scale urban agriculture was established as its own category of permitted use, and urban agriculture was removed from the definition of home occupation. This further enabled urban food production since many of the restrictions associated with home occupation uses do not reflect the business model for urban farming. Additionally, this modification permits the pursuit of both a home occupation and a small-scale urban food production.

Overall, the bylaw changes for small-scale commercial urban food production received wide support from the community. The extensive consultation process afforded opportunities to integrate feedback and concerns as well as revise proposed changes.

Examples of issues\concerns identified through the community consultation and policy adoption process include;

- Pesticide use and compatibility of residential and urban agriculture uses (traffic, odour, parking, aesthetics etc.)

- Long-term integrity of structures such as greenhouses

- Regulatory barriers for community members  wishing to participate

Cross-Departmental Collaboration

Collaboration among departments was an essential element of the development, implementation and roll-out processes. The Sustainable Planning and Community Development Department, and the Parks Recreation and Facilities Department worked closely in order to capture both the potential of City lands to contribute to community food production and the potential of private lands to be used for commercial urban food production. Throughout the implementation and roll out of the policy changes, close and ongoing communication was also maintained between many departments, including Parks, Planning, Legal Services, Engagement, Business Licensing, and Bylaw Services.

Policy Implementation

The City of Victoria is in the process of communicating and implementing the new bylaw changes. Doing so requires both internal and public communication strategies.

Given that the bylaw changes impact city operations across departments, substantial effort is being made to ensure that the appropriate information and resources are provided to all implicated departments so that all City staff are aware of the new procedures. This includes preparing “cheat-sheets” to summarize changes, discussing roadside stand regulations with bylaw enforcement officers, working closely with the business licensing department who will receive urban food production business applications, and training staff in the ‘Business Hub’ - Victoria’s first point of contact for business-related enquiries. 

Implementing the new policies requires thoughtful training efforts and dedicated staff time to communicate important nuances. For example, the sale of sprouts, which are considered a high risk food by Island Health, is not permitted under small-scale commercial urban food production, while the sale of shoots is permitted. Therefore City staff must distinguish between these two similar raw, unprocessed food items with different regulatory constraints.

Public resources to aid in policy interpretation have been made available on the City of Victoria’s website at http://www.victoria.ca/foodproduction, as well as distributed at community events. These materials include a handbook summarizing the bylaw changes and providing tips and considerations for the design and implementation of small-scale urban food production, as well as other community resources (e.g. urban agriculture organizations that can provide additional information.) A single page “Urban Food” fact sheet that summarizes the handbook is also available as an initial communication tool to direct those interested to additional resources. A Building and Operating a Food Stand fact sheet provides information specific to food stands.

Policy Outcomes and Recommendations

The City of Victoria is in the process of monitoring business licenses, applications and uptake in order to assess the outcomes of bylaw changes.

 

 

References

Growing in the City' - Part 1: Urban Food Production on City-owned lands, 2016. Presented to City of Victoria, of the Whole Feb 25th, 2016. Retrieved from  http://victoria.ca.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=690

‘Growing in the City’ - Part 2: Regulatory Amendments to Support Small-Scale Commercial Urban Farming, 2016. Presented to City of Victoria Committee of the Whole, Feb 25th, 2016. Retrieved from http://victoria.ca.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=2&clip_id=690

City of Victoria, Growing in the City PHASE TWO: COMMUNITY FEEDBACK REPORT, October 2015 – January 2016. Retrieved from https://victoria.civicweb.net/FileStorage/64F2A909F0314676A7FCA65AB93B261C-3_Appendix%20B_Phase%202%20Engagement%20Summary%20Report.pdf, January 2017.

City of Victoria, Parks, Recreation and Facilities, personal communication, November 2016.

 

 

Topic: Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: greenhouses, residential development, urban farm, zoning

Region: Capital | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: n.d.

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

urban agriculture;

food production;

urban farm; Small-scale commercial urban food production is permitted in all zones, provided it is not noxious or offensive to neighbours or the general public by reason of emitting odour, noise or artificial lighting, and is subject to the regulations contained in Schedule “L”. 42
urban agriculture;

greenhouses;

residential development;

A rooftop greenhouse is not to be included in the calculation of total floor area, height or number of storeys, except when located on a lot which contains: (a) a single family dwelling; (b) an attached dwelling; (c) a semi-attached dwelling; (d) a house conversion; or (e) a multiple dwelling containing fewer than four self-containing dwelling units. 43
urban agriculture; greenhouses; A rooftop greenhouse must not exceed: (a) 3.65m in height; or (b) 28m² or 50% of the building’s roof area, whichever is less. 44

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture, Waste Management

Sub-topics: zoning, farm retail/farm gate sales, composting, farm home plate, pollinators, beekeeping/apiculture, livestock, siting and coverage, ALR, farm worker accommodation, residential development

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2015

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

livestock;

Beekeeping:

Notwithstanding Section 304, the keeping of ‘bees’ are permitted as an accessory use to a ‘dwelling, single family’, ‘dwelling duplex’ or in any Public (P) zone provided that:

a) Not more than two ‘beehives’ and two ‘nucleus colonies’ are permitted on ‘lots’ equal to or less than 1,000 m2 in area.

b) Not more than four ‘beehives’ and four ‘nucleus colonies’ are permitted on ‘lots’ larger than 1,000 m2 in area.

c) Each ‘beehive’ and ‘nucleus colony’ shall be located to the rear of the principal building on a ‘lot.

d) Each ‘beehive’ and ‘nucleus colony’ shall comply with one of the following siting requirements: i. be raised a minimum of 2.5 m above grade; ii. be located a minimum of 7.5 m from all ‘lot’ lines; or iii. be behind a continuous ‘fence’ or hedge a minimum of 1.8 m in height located parallel to an adjacent property line and extending a minimum of 6.0 m horizontally beyond the ‘beehive’ or ‘nucleus colony’ in either direction.

e) In the P zones: i. written permission is obtained from the property owner; and ii. the keeping of ‘bees’ is for educational purposes.

428
development and productive use of agricultural land;

siting and coverage;

ALR;

See document for siting and coverage regulations for buildings and structures in Agricultural Zone A1.

502 ; 503 ; 510-512
development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm home plate;

ALR;

‘Farm Home Plate’ and ‘Farm Home Plate’ – ‘Migrant Farm Worker Housing’:

See document for regulations and related to farm home plate in Agricultural Zone A

506
development and productive use of agricultural land;

residential development;

farm worker accommodation:

ALR;

Area of a ‘Farm House’, ‘Additional Farm House’ or ‘Migrant Farm Worker Housing’:

See document for regulations and related to area of a farm house,  additional farm house or migrant farm worker housing in Agricultural Zone A.

507
development and productive use of agricultural land;

residential development;

ALR;

Additional Farm House:

See document for regulations and related to additional farm house in Agricultural Zone A1.

 
development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm worker accommodation;

ALR;

‘Migrant Farm Worker Housing‘:

See document for regulations related to migrant farm worker housing in Agricultural Zone A1.

508 B

food processing, storage and distribution;

 

ALR;

‘Agricultural Product’ and ‘Mushroom Growing Medium’ Storage, Processing and Preparation:

A minimum of 50% of the total volume of the ‘Agricultural Products’ or ‘Mushroom Growing Medium’ stored on a ‘Lot’ or processed or prepared by ‘On-farm Processing’ or ‘On-Farm Product Preparation’ on a ‘Lot’:

a) must be consumed as animal feed or used in the production of mushrooms, on a farm owned or operated by the owner or lessee of the ‘Lot’: or

b) must have been harvested, grown, raised, or produced on a farm owned or operated by the owner or lessee of the ‘Lot’.

513
waste management;

composting;

ALR;

Agricultural Waste Management and ‘On-Farm Composting’

See document for regulations related to agricultural waste management and 'on- farm' composting in Agricultural Zone A1.

514
food sales, access and procurement;

farm retail/gate sales

ALR;

Farm Retail Sales

See document for regulations related to farm retail sales in Agricultural Zone A1.

515

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, farm home plate, farm residence maximum setback, livestock, pollinators, siting and coverage

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub Topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm home plate;

farm residence maximum setback;

FARM HOME PLATE

1) A farm residence and all farm residence accessory facilities must be located within the farm home plate.

2) The area of the farm home plate is limited to the greater of 10% of the lot area or 1000m2 , up to a maximum of 2000m2 .

3) A farm residence must be entirely located within an area no more than 50m from the front lot line or the exterior side lot line, whichever provides access to the farm residence. 4) Farm residence accessory facilities on lots with a lot width of more than 33m must be entirely located within an area no more than 60m from the front lot line or the exterior side lot line, whichever provides access to the farm residence.

1.4
development and productive use of agricultural land; siting and coverage; See document for regulations for siting and coverage for buildings and structures in Agricultural Zone (A). Table 1.4 and notes to Table 1.4

urban agriculture;

food production;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

livestock;

ACCESSORY HOBBY BEEKEEPING

14.1. Accessory hobby beekeeping must comply with the following regulations:

a. A maximum of 2 beehives and 2 nucleus colonies may be located on a lot;

b. The lot must have a minimum width of 14 metres (46 ft.);

c. A beehive or nucleus colony must not be located in a front or side yard;

d. A beehive or nucleus colony must not be located within 2 metres (6.6 ft.) of a rear lot line; and,

e. A solid fence or landscape screen with a minimum height of 2 metres (6.6 ft) must enclose a rear yard containing a beehive or nucleus colony.

section III 14