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Welcome to the B.C. Food System Policy Database

This database is a centralized resource for planners, policy makers, community advocates, local organizations and the policy curious to search for policy precedents and to better understand how local government policy in B.C. is addressing local food systems. Search by a range of characteristics to find food system policies that have been adopted by local governments across B.C. For more information about using the database and how it was developed see How to use the Database

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Institute for Sustainable Food Systems

Displaying 171 - 180 of 213 Results

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: livestock, urban chickens

Region: Bulkeley-Nechako | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: n.d.

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

urban chickens;

livestock;

FARM ANIMALS

Poultry, Pigeons or Doves - No poultry, pigeons, or doves shall be kept in any part of a dwelling house or in any store or other place of business, except in a business licensed through the Town of Smithers to sell or keep such fowl.

Permitted Areas for Hens

ln residential zones R-l, R-2, R-6 and P-1 in auxiliary to a Community Garden (as well as existing permitted zoned R-7 and A-1 and the Fall Fair Grounds) the keeping of hens will be permitted for personal use, provided that no neighbourhood health, environmental or nuisance problems result.

Keeping of Hens

The keeping of hens for domestic purpose is permitted as an auxiliary use to a detached, singte-family dwelling on any lot with an area greater than 550mt ¡5,920 f() in R-1, R-2, R-6 and P-1 Zones, subject to the following conditions:

a) The owner of the propefty resides on the property where the hens are kept, or obtains written permission from the property owner;

b) Roosters are prohibited;

c) The keeping of hens is limited to a maximum of: i. six (6) hens as an auxiliary use for a detached, single-family dwelling; ii. twelve (12) hens on a P-1 property in conjunction with a Community Garden; iii. twelve (12) poultry for each 0.4 ha of parcel area in zones A-1 or R-7.

d) Hens must be kept in a run that is: i. fenced on all sides and entirely covered from above in a manner that will keep predators and vermin from entering and hems from escaping; ii. of sufficient size to provide at least 1.0 m' (10.76 f() of roofed outdoor enclosure per hen; and iii. sited at least 3.0 m (9.84 ft) from the principal building and 1.5 m from the side or rear property line, while being located to the side or rear of the principal building.

e) At least one (1) coop must be provided in such a way that it: i. is kept clean and be monitored daily for suitable cleanliness; ii. is sited at least 3.0 m (9.84 ft) from the principal building and 1.5 m from the side or rear property line, while being located to the side or rear of the principal building; iii. altows at least 0.5 mz (ffi f() of coop floor area per hen; and iv. includes af /easf one perch no shorter than fifteen (15) cm, per hen and one nest box, per 4 hens

 f) All hens must be provided sufficient food, water, shelter, light, ventilation, veterinary care; and opportunities for essential behaviors such as scratching, dust-bathing, and roosting; to maintain good health; 6-4. TOWN OF SMITHERS BYLAW NO. 1780 Page 10

g) That feed be stored in such a manner as to not provide an attractant to bears, other wildlife, or vermin;

h) Manure must be stored within a fully enclosed structure, with no more than O.O8*t P fÛ of manure stored at one time;

i) All manure not used for composting or fertilizing must be removed from the property;

j) Biosecurity procedures musf be followed as recommended by the Canadian Food lnspection Agency;

k) Hens are permitted for personal use only, and selling eggs, manure, meat, or other products derived from hens is prohibited;

l) Slaughtering or euthanizing hens within Town limits is prohibited unless at a certified facility; and m) Backyard hen flocks must be registered for a fee of $15 with the Town of Smithers by completing Schedule 'C' of this Bylaw.

6.1-6.3
food production; livestock;

KEEPING OF FARM ANIMALS

No person shall cause or permit any cattle or farm animals to be kept or harboured within the Town, whether on private property or not, unless as allowed in the R-7 Rural Residential Hobby Farm, A-1 Agricultural Zone, or as allowed on the Fall Fair Grounds.

6.4

 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Economic Development, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning

Sub-topics: agri-tourism, ALR, farm home plate, farm retail/farm gate sales, greenhouses, siting and coverage, zoning

Region: Fraser Valley | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm home plate;

ALR;

Farm Home Plate and Farm Employee Residence

The following farm home plate and farm employee residence requirements shall apply to all lots within the Agricultural Land Reserve and are subject to the provisions of the Agricultural Land Commission Act.

.1 General Requirements

(a) With the exception of Part 7.14.1 (b), all lots within the Agricultural Land Reserve, the farm residence, farm employee residence, home occupation, and all accessory residential facilities must be located within the farm home plate area;

(b) Farm home plate requirements do not apply to lots that are exempt from the Agricultural Land Commission Act restrictions on the use of agricultural land.

.2 Siting Requirements

(a) Maximum area of a farm home plate containing one farm residence is 2,023 m2 (21,780 ft2 ) (0.5 acres).

(b) A farm home plate containing a farm employee residence and or home occupation located within an accessory building may be increased by a maximum of 506 m2 (5,445 ft2 ) (0.125 acres).

(c) Maximum depth for a farm home plate is 60 m (196.85 ft) measured from a dedicated road. If the road is not dedicated then the depth shall be measured from the constructed road.

(d) One boundary of a farm home plate must be located at a property line fronting on a road from which vehicular access is obtained.

(e) The rear face of a farm residence or farm employee residence must not be less than 10 m (32.81 ft) from the rear of the farm home plate.

(f) A Development Variance Permit may be considered in order to vary Part 7.14.2(a) to (e) where it can be demonstrated that the variance improves the agricultural suitability of the lot.

.3 Floor Area Requirements

(a) The maximum floor area for a farm residence on a lot less than 8 Ha (19.77 acres) shall be 372 m2 (4,000 ft2 ).

(b) The maximum floor area for a farm residence on a lot 8 Ha (19.77 acres) and greater shall be 465 m2 (5,000 ft2 ).

(c) The maximum floor area for a farm employee residence shall be 279 m2 (3,000 ft2 ).

.4 Farm Employee Residence

(a) A person may apply for a farm employee residence by completing an application on the prescribed form and shall include a detailed site plan.

(b) The owner will be required to register a Section 219 covenant against the property title at the Land Title Office which will specify the farm employee residence details submitted in the application form and accompanying site plan.

(c) A farm employee residence is not permitted on any lot less than 4.0 ha (9.88 acres).

(d) A maximum of one (1) farm employee residence is permitted on any lot subject to Part 7.14.4 (c).

7.14
economic development;

agri-tourism;

ALR;

Buildings and structures for agri-tourism use:

i. shall be limited to 300m2 in area, excluding exterior activity areas;

ii. shall be limited to a catered food and beverage service where farm products from the farm operation are highlighted; maximum seating capacity for 40 patrons;

iii. shall be seasonal, meaning they will be closed for 30 days a year including one closure of a minimum of 2 weeks; iv. where utilized for biodiversity conservation, passive recreation, heritage, wildlife and scenery view purposes, shall not exceed 100m2 , when the principal agri-tourism buildings or structures are 100m2 or less.

9.1.2.4
food sales, access and procurement

farm retail/gate sales;

ALR;

Buildings and structures for farm retail sales use shall:

i. be limited to one building or structure per Farm Retail Sales use; and ii. have a maximum floor are of 300m2 , including both indoor and outdoor sales and display areas

9.1.2.5
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning; greenhouses;

Illuminated Greenhouses

(a) shall have sidewall abatement measures, such as curtains, screens, berms or plantings, for all side walls that expose neighbouring properties and roads to light emissions and; (b) must operate their lighting systems so that the calculated light emissions from the greenhouse do not exceed 5,000 lux.

9.1.2.6
development and productive use of agricultural land;

siting and coverage;

ALR;

See document for siting and coverage regulations for buildings and structures in Agriculture Zone (A).

9.1.3

 

 

Supplementary Information

 

Municipal Planner Interview with the District of Kent Re: Farm Residence Home Plate Restriction

Adopted in 2012, The District of Kent’s home plate bylaw regulates the footprint of employee residences, farm worker residences as well as home occupations within accessory buildings.

Policy Development and Community Consultation

The home plate bylaw, initially recommended within the District’s Agricultural Area Plan, was created as a precautionary measure to prevent the loss of agricultural land to large residential estates – a prevalent trend in neighbouring municipalities in the Lower Mainland.  It was noted that the fragmented agricultural land base increased the vulnerability of Kent to such a trend.

The home plate bylaw was developed by the Department of Planning in partnership with the District’s Agricultural Advisory Committee (AAC), who contributed to developing the bylaw language. A public meeting was held to review potential bylaw changes and seek additional community feedback. Additionally, members of the public had the opportunity to attend AAC meetings at which the bylaw was discussed, as District of Kent AAC meetings are open to the public.

It was reported that the agricultural community was supportive of the bylaw, provided that flexibility was afforded for variances that would improve the agricultural suitability of the site. (E.g.: variance of the location of the home plate would be afforded based on site-specific characteristics including drainage, existing paved surfaces etc.). Language to this affect has been included in the bylaw and appropriate variances have been granted since its adoption.

Policy Adoption

The building size and floor area requirements were the most challenging aspects of the bylaw to draft, particularly those related to farm employee residences. Committee members and Council reviewed numerous building size options for the farm residence and farm employee residence prior to obtaining consensus. There was also discussion as to whether or not the farm employee residence should be limited to a mobile home. Ultimately, the mobile home restriction was not supported but a minimum lot size for a farm employee residence was. It was noted that the absence of a real estate lobby in the District helped facilitate the ease at which the bylaw was adopted.

Policy Implementation

Guiding documents are available to assist applicants through the building permit process. As part of this process, applicants are required to submit a home plate boundary site plan. A home plate plan prepared by a legal land surveyor is usually only required on more complex applications, however professional quality plans are generally expected. Generally, when an applicant chooses to prepare his own plan without the assistance of a qualified professional, staff has to spend a considerable amount of time with the applicant to ensure the plan is acceptable.

Policy Outcomes and Recommended Improvements

The home plate bylaw was identified by the District of Kent as an effective preventative measure to discourage large rural estate developments on agricultural land.

Suggested improvements could include more comprehensive guiding documents, particularly documents to direct the creation of site plans in order to facilitate the application process. It was noted that the increased person-to-person involvement of the Planning and Building Department during the initial applications afforded City staff the opportunity to better understand the agriculture sector in the District and keep a pulse on development within the community. 

 

District of Kent, Planning and Development Services, personal communication, October 2016

 

 

Topic: Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning, Urban Agriculture, Waste Management

Sub-topics: zoning, composting, urban chickens, beekeeping/apiculture, signage in agricultural areas, urban farm, pollinators, farm retail/farm gate sales, livestock, nuisance complaints

Region: Comox Valley | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-Topic Policy or Policy excerpt Document Location

urban agriculture;

urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

urban farm;

nuisance complaints;

Urban Agriculture

a) Urban agriculture shall not generate pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or parking, in excess of that which is characteristic of the Zone in which it is.

b) Urban agriculture activity shall not generate odour, waste, noise, smoke, glare, fire hazard, visual impact, or any other hazard or nuisance, in excess of that which is characteristic of the Zone in which it is located under normal circumstances wherein no urban agriculture exists.

4.13 (a) (b)
       

waste management;

urban agriculture;

composting; c) Compost bins and composting shall: i) be located at least 3.0metres (9.8feet) from any lot line; however, this setback may be reduced to 0.0metres (0.0feet) when opaque screening is in place or a solid bin is in use; and ii) only consist of plant, plant based material, or animal manure and shall not utilize any mechanized processes. 4.13 (c)

urban agriculture;

food sales, access and procurement;

farm retail/gate sales;

urban farm;

d) A roadside stand shall: i) be the only form of commercial sales for an urban agriculture use; ii) have a GFA of not more than 5.0square metres (53.8square feet); iii) only allow sales between 7am and 9pm; iv) be entirely located on the lot on which the produce is grown; and v) be located on the property and must not impede sightlines to and from a public road, driveway or laneway. 4.13 (d)

urban agriculture;

food production;

beekeeping/apiculture;

polinators;

livestock;

e) Beekeeping (beekeeping for domestic purposes) is permitted on all lots allowing urban agriculture provided that:

i) lots have a minimum lot width of 15.0metres (49.2feet);

ii) lots have a minimum lot area is 550.0square metres (1,804.4sqaure feet); Zoning Bylaw No. 1027, 2016 Page 43 As Adopted September 6, 2016 Part 4 – Additional Zoning Regulations for Certain Uses or Circumstances

iii) a solid fence or dense hedge, known as a “flyway barrier,” at least 1.8metres (6.0feet) in height, shall be placed along the side of the hive that contains the entrance to the hive, and shall be located within 1.5metres (5.0feet) of the hive and shall extend at least 0.6metres (2.0feet) on either side of the hive. No such flyway barrier shall be required if all beehives are located at least 7.6metres (25.0feet) from all property lines and for hives that are located on porches or balconies at least 3.0metres (10.0feet) abovegrade, except if such porch or balcony is located less than 1.5metres (5.0feet) from a property line;

iv) hives shall be at least 6.0metres (19.6feet) from any neighbouring house, sidewalks, streets and public areas (e.g., parks);

v) honey bees shall be housed in hives;

vi) hives shall be registered with the Provincial authority, BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands (BCMAL) [for additional information contact the Provincial Apiculturist Apiary Inspector];

vii) only two hives with colonies shall be permitted on each lot;

viii) hives shall be securely located to prevent accidental disturbance or trespass by people and pets, and to prevent damage from wildlife;

ix) hives shall be equipped with adequate ventilation and near a water source; x) honey production is for personal consumption only; and

xi) beekeeping is not permitted in multi-family residential areas, including strata developments, or commercial and industrial areas.

4.13 (e)

urban agriculture;

food production;

urban chickens;

livestock;

f) The keeping of hens is permitted on all lots allowing urban agriculture use, provided that:

i) a coop and run shall be located at least 1.5metres (4.9feet) from all property lines unless there is a solid barrier such as a wall or fence;

ii) coops and runs shall not be located within a 4.5metre (14.8feet) buffer of habitable structures on adjacent property(ies);

iii) runs shall not exceed 4.5metres (14.8feet) in height;

iv) hens shall only be located in the rear yard;

v) the maximum number of hens shall be six (6) per lot;

vi) roosters are not permitted;

vii) sales of eggs, manure and other products associated with the keeping of hens are prohibited;

viii) coops and runs shall be maintained in a clean condition and the coop shall be kept free of obnoxious odours, substances and vermin;

ix) stored manure shall be kept in an enclosed structure such as a compost bin and no more than 3.0cubic metres (105.9cubic feet) shall be stored at any one time;

x) manure shall be disposed of in accordance with municipal bylaws; hen waste must be solid and bagged; and

xi) home slaughter of hens is prohibited and any deceased hens shall be disposed of at a livestock disposal facility or through the services of a veterinarian.

  4.13 (f)

food production;

urban agriculture;

livestock; g) The keeping and raising of livestock shall only be permitted on lots greater than 0.4hectares (1.0acre). 4.13 (g)

urban agriculture;

food sales, access and procurement;

urban farm;

farm retail/gate sales;

Market Gardens

a) In zones permitting market gardens, the following is permitted:

i) only food and value-added products made from produce grown on site may be sold;

ii) selling requires a Business License from the Village;

iii) sales are only allowed between 7am and 9pm; iv) sales are allowed up to six months between April 1 and September 30 in each calendar year; and v) only one sign is permitted per lot (see Part 5.0 Signage).

4.14 (a)

urban agriculture;

urban- agriculture conflict and edge planning;

nuisance complaints;

urban farm;

b) Market gardens must not:

i) generate pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or parking, in excess of that which is characteristic of the Zone in which it is located;

ii) generate odour, waste, noise, smoke, glare, and fire hazard, visual impact, or any other hazard or nuisance, in excess of that which is characteristic of the Zone in which it is located under normal circumstances wherein no urban agriculture exists;

iii) Include the growing and sale of mushrooms;

iv) include composting for producing mushroom growing media; and v) include medical marihuana facilities, marihuana dispensary, or any portion thereof, or be used for the growing of marihuana or other controlled substances.

4.14 (b)

urban agriculture;

food sales, access and procurement;

farm retail/gate sales

c) On-site sales of fruits, vegetables and edible plants shall be permitted within roadside stands for products grown on site provided that the size of the roadside stand does not exceed a GFA of 5.0square metres (53.8square feet). 4.14 (c)
urban agriulture;

urban farm;

signs in agricultural areas;

...b) Signs pertaining to the commercial components on a lot where a mixed use, residential multifamily, commercial, public assembly, industrial, agricultural, or retail development is permitted, provided that the signs permitted by this Part shall only be located on those portions of the lot and building that contain the commercial component. ....

5.4 (b)

 

Supplementary Information

 

Municipal Planner Interview with the Village of Cumberland Re: Urban Agriculture and Market Garden Uses

The Village of Cumberland’s zoning bylaw, adopted in September 2016, includes provisions for urban agriculture and market garden land uses including the production and sale of select agricultural and horticultural products.

Permitted activities are described in the Urban Agriculture and Market Garden Toolkit as well as the Zoning Bylaw.

Policy Development and Community Consultation

Cumberland’s zoning bylaw was amended to include urban agriculture and market garden provisions after community members voiced interest in keeping backyard chickens as well as growing and selling agricultural products on properties in the Village.

A number of communities with existing urban agriculture and backyard chicken bylaws were consulted during the development of the bylaw amendments, including the City of Vancouver, the City of Victoria and the City of Campbell River.  Given capacity and resource constraints of the Village, the provisions of practical information and educational resources regarding agricultural practices was prioritized over regulatory enforcement, such as coop registration and inspection.

Community members were consulted regarding bylaw amendments, including this one, in public meetings held during the zoning bylaw revision process. Urban agriculture and market garden provisions were strongly supported by the community. Provisions to include beekeeping among the permitted urban agriculture activities were added as a result of community input. 

Policy Adoption

Urban agriculture and market garden provisions were strongly supported by Council and the community during the adoption of Cumberland’s new zoning bylaw.

Policy Implementation and Outcomes

The new urban agriculture provisions will be communicated to the public in the form of informational brochures/handouts and potential public workshops.  Having adopted the new zoning bylaw in September 2016, the Village of Cumberland is looking forward to new food production enterprises and local food access opportunities.

 

References

Village of Cumberland, Planning and Development, personal communication, October 2016

Village of Cumberland, Urban Agriculture and Market Garden Toolkit, 2016 Retrieved from https://cumberland.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/tool_kit_urban_ag_market_grdn_20160817.pdf, December 2016.

 

 

Topic: Economic Development, Education, Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Land Access, Nutrition and Public Health, Urban Agriculture, Waste Management

Sub-topics: local procurement, food distribution, edible landscaping, composting, urban chickens, mobile/street food vending, beekeeping/apiculture, urban farm, pilot project, pollinators, grocery stores, farm retail/farm gate sales, community kitchen, community food system education, commercial development, livestock, farmers' markets, residential development, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Food Strategy | Year: 2013

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating

urban agriculture;

land access;

urban gardens/orchard; Explore opportunities to improve security of tenure for community gardens and community orchards on city property.  1.1  
urban agriculture; urban gardens/orchard;  Improve accessibility and clarity of application processes for creating or participating in community gardens and community orchards,  particularly for under-represented ethno-cultural communities.  1.2  

urban agriculture;

education;

urban gardens/orchard;

community food system education;

Encourage community garden models which promote community  development opportunities with local schools, Neighbourhood Houses, and other local organizations as part of their education programming.  1.3 *
urban agriculture; urban gardens/orchards; Enhance funding partnerships to support the creation, operation, improvement and capacity building opportunities for community gardens and community orchards. 1.5  
urban agriculture; urban gardens/orchard; Work with the Association of Community Garden Coordinators to implement strategies that will reduce community garden waiting lists  and to improve access for ethno-cultural communities.  1.8  
urban agriculture;

urban farm;

farm retail/farm gate sales;

Explore possibilities for urban farmers to sell produce directly from an urban farm (farm gate sales) with appropriate limitations and  mitigation strategies. 1.11  

urban agriculture;

food processing, storage and distribution;

food distribution;

urban farm;

farmers' markets;

Enable alternative food retail and distribution models for urban farming produce such as community food markets, food distribution hubs and pre-approved Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) distribution sites in locations such as community centres, neighbourhood houses and schools.  1.12 *
 

edible landscaping;

commercial development;

institutional development;

residential development;

Promote edible landscaping as an alternative to ornamental or flowering plants in residential, commercial, institutional and parks landscaping plans.  1.18  
urban agriculture;

urban gardens/orchard;

edible landscaping;

Increase the planting of food-bearing trees when planting new trees in parks and on other civic lands, and encourage community stewardship of those trees. 1.19 *

food production;

education;

urban agriculture;

beekeeping/apiculture;

pollinators;

community food system education;

livestock; 

Support public education programs on pollinator bees, honeybees and beekeeping in response to community demand and interest. 1.22 *

food production;

education;

urban agriculture;

urban chickens;

community food system education;

livestock; 

Support public education programs on backyard hens in response to community demand and interest. 1.25 *
food processing, storage and distribution; food distribution; Support businesses and social enterprises involved in processing and distribution of healthy, local and sustainable food within Vancouver and connect to local agricultural producers in the region. 2.4 *
food sales, access and procurement; local procurement; Explore opportunities to increase the percentage of local and sustainable food purchased by City and  school facilities as a way to support local farmers and producers.  2.6  
food sales, access and procurement; local procurement; Explore opportunities to increase the percentage of local and sustainable food purchased by Park facilities including community centres and concessions in parks and beaches.  2.7  
food sales, access and procurement; local procurement; Examine opportunities for aggregation of local and sustainable food purchasing among neighbourhood houses, smaller community centres  and childcare centres. 2.8  
food sales, access and procurement;

community kitchen;

residential development;

Encourage installation of community kitchens or retrofit existing kitchens in new developments, social housing  sites or City facilities.  2.9 *
food sales, access and procurement; farmers' markets; Explore opportunities to support farmers markets on Park Board sites with electricity and water where appropriate.  3.5  
food sales, access and procurement; farmers' markets; Establish community food markets as a permitted use and streamline application process.  3.9 *

food sales, access and procurement;

nutrition and public health;

farmers' markets; Encourage integration of community food markets into Vancouver School Board programming as part of healthy food options for youth and families.  3.10 *
food sales, access and procurement; farmers' markets; Incorporate community food markets into community centre programming. 3.11 *

food sales, access and procurement;

nutrition and public health;

mobile/street food vending; 

pilot project;

grocery stores;

Test pilot programs that improve access to healthy food in neighbourhoods (e.g. healthy corner stores, pop-up grocery stores or mobile green grocers). 3.14 *
food sales, access and procurement; mobile/street food vending; Explore options to enable street food vending on private property.   3.16  
food sales, access and procurement;

local procurement;

mobile/street food vending;

Encourage street food vendors to source local and sustainable ingredients in their menus, and require vendors to use reusable, recyclable or compostable packaging.  3.18 *

food sales, access and procurement;

economic development;

mobile/street food vending; Encourage street food vending as an economic development opportunity for low-income groups 3.19 *
waste management;   Develop strategies to reduce food packaging in City facilities. 4.2 *
waste management; composting; Ensure that food composting is available in City facilities, and that dishes and food packaging are reusable, recyclable or compostable.  4.3 *
waste management; composting; Support community composting model. 4.6  

 

Supplementary Information

 

Municipal Planner Interview with the City of Vancouver Re: City of Vancouver's Food Strategy

After over a decade of food policy and planning initiatives, the City of Vancouver developed a Food Strategy to establish a coordinated approach to food systems planning.

Policy Development

In 2003, Council approved a motion to develop a “just and sustainable food system for the City of Vancouver”. The motion spurred the formation of Vancouver’s Food Policy Council (a citizen advisory group on food policy issues) as well as the creation of two planning positions to focus on food systems. Subsequently, a number of food-related policy and programs took root between 2003 and 2013. Some of these include the development of urban chicken keeping and beekeeping guidelines, grants to support neighbourhood food networks, street food program expansion, a kitchen scrap collection program, Vancouver’s Food Charter, and the Greenest City Action Plan. The latter two policies, which called for a coordinated strategy to focus the City’s efforts surrounding food systems, ultimately paved the way for the creation of the Food Strategy.

Consultation

Both internal and public engagement were priorities during the development of the Food Strategy.

These included broad engagement efforts with the general public as well as targeted engagement with specific community groups such as urban farmers, community organizations, cultural groups and youth.

Internally, the planning department reached out to many city managerial divisions, including Real-Estate, Parks, Finance, Sustainability, the Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation and others to increase bureaucratic capacity for the project and foster cross-departmental cooperation.

Policy Adoption

The magnitude and range of ideas that were proposed by the draft plan complicated the adoption process, necessitating numerous iterations and a strategic evaluation of the contents against the local government’s capacity and jurisdiction. Applying such a pragmatic approach to refining the document was deemed necessary for the Food Strategy to be useful and achievable.

Policy Implementation

Vancouver’s dedicated staff planning positions have been key to implementing the Food Strategy since its adoption in 2013. It was reported that an ongoing challenge in implementing the Strategy has been adapting and accounting for emerging topics in food systems planning. Examples of these emerging themes include school food programs, indigenous food systems and the relationship between food security and income security.

Policy Outcomes and Recommendations

The Food Strategy has resulted in the creation and implementation of a multitude of policies and projects that are helping Vancouver move toward a just and sustainable food system. Some of these outcomes include:

Given the descriptive nature of the Food Strategy goals, it was reported that monitoring impact is an ongoing challenge. The Food Strategy provides directives, but not measurable goals, and therefore presents a challenge in evaluating progress. While annual reviews are conducted, it was reported that further monitoring could be beneficial.

 

References

City of Vancouver, Department of Social Policy, personal communication, November 2016.

 

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban chickens, livestock

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

urban chickens;

livestock

Registration of hens

7.15 A person must not keep a hen unless that person first registers with the city:

(a) electronically by: (i) accessing the city's animal control computer website at http://vancouver.ca/animalcontrol, (ii) accessing the link from that website to the on-line registry at http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/licandinsp/animalcontrol/chicken/inde x.htm, (iii) reading the information on keeping hens at the on-line registry site, (iv) completing the application at the on-line registry site including the following mandatory fields: (A) the date, (B) the person's name, address and postal code, (C) confirmation that the person resides on the property where he or she will be keeping hens, (D) confirmation that the person has read the information referred to in clause (iii), and - 10 - (v) submitting the application to the on-line registry site; or

(b) by requesting, by telephone to 311, the mailing to that person of the information on keeping hens and an application form, and by: (i) reading such information, (ii) completing the application including the mandatory fields referred to in subsection (a)(iv), and (iii) submitting the completed application to the city; and such person must promptly update, and provide to, the city any information given when any change occurs.”

Keeping of hens

7.16 A person who keeps one or more hens must:

(a) provide each hen with at least 0.37 m² of coop floor area, and at least 0.92 m² of roofed outdoor enclosure;

(b) provide and maintain a floor of any combination of vegetated or bare earth in each outdoor enclosure;

(c) provide and maintain, in each coop, at least one perch, for each hen, that is at least 15 cm long, and one nest box;

(d) keep each hen in the enclosed area at all times;

(e) provide each hen with food, water, shelter, light, ventilation, veterinary care, and opportunities for essential behaviours such as scratching, dust-bathing, and roosting, all sufficient to maintain the hen in good health;

(f) maintain each hen enclosure in good repair and sanitary condition, and free from vermin and obnoxious smells and substances;

(g) construct and maintain each hen enclosure to prevent any rodent from harbouring underneath or within it or within its walls, and to prevent entrance by any other animal;

(h) keep a food container and water container in each coop;

(i) keep each coop locked from sunset to sunrise;

(j) remove leftover feed, trash, and manure in a timely manner;

(k) store manure within a fully enclosed structure, and store no more than three cubic feet of manure at a time;

(l) remove all other manure not used for composting or fertilizing;

(m) follow biosecurity procedures recommended by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency;

(n) keep hens for personal use only, and not sell eggs, manure, meat, or other products derived from hens;

(o) not slaughter, or attempt to euthanize, a hen on the property;

(p) not dispose of a hen except by delivering it to the Poundkeeper, or to a farm, abattoir, veterinarian, mobile slaughter unit, or other facility that has the ability to dispose of hens lawfully; or

(q) not keep a hen in a cage.

7.15 -7.16

 

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban chickens, livestock

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Guideline | Year: 2010

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This report provides recommendations for the humane and sanitary keeping of backyard hens in Vancouver. These recommendations include amendments to Zoning and Development Bylaw No. 3575 and Animal Control By-law No. 9150, creation of an on-line registry for hen keepers, and funding for facilities to house hens at the Vancouver Animal Control shelter. The Zoning and Development By-law amendments must proceed to Public Hearing prior to Council action. Since the Zoning and Development By-law amendments are integral to the proposed system of regulation, the remainder of the recommendations are contingent upon their approval. 

from http://vancouver.ca/people-programs/backyard-chickens.aspx

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, pollinators, livestock

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Guideline | Year: 2006

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Urban honey beekeeping is permitted everywhere in the city, however site-specific requirements need to be considered for residential and commercial areas or if beekeeping is taking place in community gardens. Section 1 outlines general requirements followed by the specific requirements in Section 2.

Topic: Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban gardens/orchard

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2015

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Description of appropriate sites, operations, supporitng facilities etc for urban agriculture in City Parks.

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement

Sub-topics: farmers' markets

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Guideline | Year: 2013

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The purpose of the guidelines is to assist farmers’ market applicants and City staff in evaluating applications for farmers’ markets by:


(a) Assessing suitability and feasibility of farmers’ markets on select zoned lands, streets, and Park sites;
(b) Ensuring that farmers’ markets meet policy and regulations listed below; and
(c) Ensuring that each location is compatible with adjacent uses to support neighbourliness: mitigation of noise, parking, traffic, pedestrian interface, size, privacy, and visual impacts on existing, neighbourhood uses. 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Food Processing, Storage & Distribution, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: ALR, farm home plate, farm residence maximum setback, farm retail/farm gate sales, food distribution, food processing, food storage, livestock, mobile/street food vending, siting and coverage, urban chickens, zoning

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: consolidated 2016

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food production;

urban agriculture;

livestock;

urban chickens;

Keeping of Animals

(a) The keeping of livestock, poultry, rabbits and chinchillas in the RA, RH, RF and RF-SS Zones is subject to the following maximum permitted numbers:

i. Two (2) livestock for every 0.4 hectare [1 acre], with the minimum lot size of 0.4 hectare [1 acre]; ii. Six (6) sheep or goats, for every 0.4 hectare [1 acre], with the minimum lot size of 0.4 hectare [1 acre]; iii. Twelve (12) head of poultry, excluding roosters, for every 0.4 hectare [1 acre], with the minimum lot size of 0.4 hectare [1 acre]; iv. Rabbits and chinchillas where the lot is 0.4 hectare [1 acre] or greater, or 2 rabbits or chinchillas where the lot is less than 0.4 hectare [1 acre]...See document for additional regulations for the keeping of animals including regulations for the keeping of urban chickens.

part 4 B.7
food sales, access and procurement; mobile/street food vending;

Portable Food Services

Portable food services providing temporary food services from a vending cart may be permitted in all commercial and industrial Zones provided that the vending cart: (a) does not exceed 4.0 sq. metres [43.0 sq. ft.] in area; (b) is capable of being moved on its own wheels without alteration or preparation; and (c) is fully self-contained with no service connection, excluding electrical connections, provided the portable vending cart is located no more than 2.0 metres [6 ft.] from the point of electrical connection.

part 4 B .9
food sales, access and procurement;

farm retail/gate sales;

Accessory uses limited to the following:

(a) Display and retail sale of products provided all of the following are satisfied:

i. all of the products offered for sale shall be produced by the farm operation or at least 50% of the floor area for product sales and display shall be limited to product produced by the farm operation;

ii. products offered for sale shall be limited to agricultural and/or horticultural products and shall exclude dressed fowl or poultry, butchered meat and/or preserved food unless dressed, butchered or preserved off-site;

iii. the cumulative maximum floor area for the display and sale of products shall not exceed 93 square metres [1,000 sq. ft.];

iv. all products offered for sale and related displays shall be located entirely within a building; and v. products offered for sale and related displays shall be an accessory use to a single family dwelling and the agricultural and/or horticultural use of the lot;

(b) i. Food and beverage service lounge associated with a farm-based winery in accordance with the Agricultural Land Commission Act/Regs/Orders;

ii. Retail sales associated with a farm-based winery in accordance with the Agricultural Land Commission Act/Regs/Orders; provided the maximum floor area for retail sales and wine tasting does not exceed 93 sq.m. [1,000 sq.ft.].

part 10 B. 9 (a) (b)
food processing, storage and distribution;

food processing;

ALR:

Primary processing of products provided at least 50% of the product being processed shall be produced by the same farm operation or is feed required for the farm operation; part 10 B. 9 (c)
development and productive use of agricultural land;

siting and coverage;

ALR:

See document for siting regulations for buildings and structures in General Agriculture Zone (A-1) and Intensive Agriculture Zone (A-2)

part 10 F. 1 (a);

part 11 E;

part 11. F.1;

development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm residence maximum setback;

ALR:

Maximum setbacks:

No portion of a single family dwelling and an additional single family dwelling or a duplex shall be located farther than 50.0 metres [164 ft] from the front lot line provided that, on a corner lot, no portion of a single family dwelling and an additional single family dwelling or a duplex shall be located farther than 50.0 metres [164 ft] from either the front lot line or the side lot line on a flanking street..

part 10 F. 1(b);

part 11 F.1(b)

development and productive use of agricultural land;

residential development;

ALR:

A secondary suite shall:

(a) Not exceed 90 square metres [968 sq.ft.] in floor area; and

(b) Occupy less than 40% of the habitable floor area of the building.

part 10 J. 1;

part 11. J.1;

development and productive use of agricultural land;

farm home plate;

ALR:

The following provisions shall apply to a farm residential footprint:

(a) The maximum size of the farm residential footprint shall be 2,000 square metres [0.5 acres];

(b) Despite Sub-section J.2.(a), the maximum size of the farm residential footprint may be increased by 1000 square metres [0.25 acres] for an additional single family dwelling or duplex where the lot is 4 hectares [10 acres] or more and is a farm operation;

and The maximum depth of the farm residential footprint from the front lot line, or the side lot line on a flanking street if it is a corner lot, shall be 60 metres [197 ft.].

part 10 J. 2;

part 11. J..2

food processing, storage and distribution;

food processing;

food storage;

food distribution;

This Zone is intended to accommodate and regulate industries which process agricultural products or provide services to agriculture. See document for regulations for Agro-Industrial Zone (IA). part 51

 

Supplementary Information

 

Municipal Planner Interview with the City of Surrey Re: Farm Homeplate Restriction

The City of Surrey’s farm home plate restriction requires the clustering of non-agricultural buildings and structures in Agricultural Zones close to the front property line. By clustering non-agricultural uses and regulating the size and siting of the associated footprint, known as the farm residential footprint, the City of Surrey aims to curtail the impact of estate development on agricultural land and the installation of long residential driveways over prime agriculture soils.

Policy Development

Given the urban areas within Surrey, the use of ALR land for residential development is an ongoing challenge within the municipality.  Approximately 7 years ago, the municipality began developing regulations for the size and siting of the farm home plate on ALR lands. It was a contentious process which resulted in the adoption of the farm residential footprint provisions into the zoning bylaw in 2012.  While the final home plate provisions cluster and limit the total footprint of residential uses (eg lawns, pools, residences, accessory buildings), they do not restrict the footprints of houses themselves. 

Public Consultation and Policy Adoption

The agricultural industry, Surrey’s Agricultural Advisory Committee and the general public were engaged during the farm home plate development and review process. Strong opposition toward limiting house size was expressed at open houses. As a result, house size restrictions were not included in the home plate provisions.

Policy Implementation

While non-compliant, pre-existing and pre-loaded sites were granted development variances and building permits, variances for future farm home plate adjustments are only to be supported where the proposal will benefit agriculture. Communicating this priority to the public and the need to implement it, takes time which was evident in the large number of variance applications submitted after the new regulations were adopted.

Policy Outcomes and Recommended Improvements

It was reported that the policy has generally helped reduce the loss of productive ALR land to residential development, but it has been less effective than initially intended. It was expressed that, to have the desired influence on restricting the use of ALR land for estate homes, a policy should ideally limit the footprint of farm residences in addition to restricting the footprint of the home plate.

References

City of Surrey, Planning and Development Division, Department of Community Planning, personal communication, October 2016