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Welcome to the B.C. Food System Policy Database

This database is a centralized resource for planners, policy makers, community advocates, local organizations and the policy curious to search for policy precedents and to better understand how local government policy in B.C. is addressing local food systems. Search by a range of characteristics to find food system policies that have been adopted by local governments across B.C. For more information about using the database and how it was developed see How to use the Database

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1) Search any field independently or in combination with other fields. Filling in more fields will narrow search results.

2) For topic and subtopic searches: Choose 'Is one of' to search for policies that include ANY of the (sub)topics selected and therefore broaden the search. Choose 'Is all of' to search for policies which include ALL of the selected (sub)topics and therefore narrow the search.

3) To view the policy contained in each document, or a description of relevant content, click "View Details", or click the document title to view the selection on its own.

4) After applying your search criteria, you can use CTRL + F on your keyboard to easily find topics/subtopics of interest within a given policy document.

 

 

 


Institute for Sustainable Food Systems

Displaying 181 - 190 of 213 Results

Topic: Economic Development, Food Sales, Access & Procurement

Sub-topics: signage in agricultural areas, farm retail/farm gate sales

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 1999

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location

food sales, access and procurement;

econoimic development;

signage in agricultural areas;

farm retail\gate sales;

See document for regulations of signs in Agricultural Zones. part 3

 

Topic: Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning

Sub-topics: covenants, buffer at agricultural edge, ALR

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2006

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A policy to establish transition areas between residential areas and the Agricultural Land Reserve. 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land

Sub-topics: ALR exclusion, ALR

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Policy | Year: 2004

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A policy to provide the context for and establish criteria that will be used for the evaluation of applications received by the City of Surrey to exclude land from the Agricultural Land Reserve. 

 

Supplementary Information

 

Municipal Planner Interview with the City of Surrey Re: Policy for Considering Application for Exclusion of Land from the ALR

In their efforts to protect farmland resources for agriculture, the City of Surrey established a policy for considering application for exclusion of land from the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). Generally, the policy calls for proposals for land exclusions from the ALR to be accompanied by a proposal to add an area of land into the ALR that is at least twice the area of that which is being excluded. The included land must be within Surrey’s city limits.

Policy Development and Adoption

This policy was developed to discourage the exclusion of land from the ALR and reduce land speculation.  It was reported that generally the policy is highly supported both internally and by the public.  A similar policy is included in the City’s OCP, adopted in 2014, as well as in its Agricultural Strategy.

Policy Implementation

Implementing the policy on an ongoing basis requires that City Planners and other staff have up to date knowledge of the policy and can identify it upon receipt of an inquiry for ALR exclusion.  Challenges to this end can arise during times of staff turnover, where knowledge gaps can lead to gaps in enforcement.

Policy Outcomes and Recommendations

It was reported that, generally, the ALR exclusion policy has helped the municipality maintain a stable ALR boundary. Inconsistencies in policy interpretation and implementation have resulted in cases where exclusions have been approved without subsequent inclusions.

In certain circumstances, the policy allows for monetary compensation (for example, providing funding toward infrastructure upgrades to improve drainage and irrigation or improving farm access) to mitigate the impacts of ALR exclusion, rather than replacement of excluded land. It was reported that monetary compensation is often a more favourable alternative for applicants seeking to exclude land from the ALR, which has impacted the policy’s effectiveness at maintaining a stable ALR boundary.

The City of Surrey has not yet been able to determine which lands outside of the current ALR boundary would be most appropriate to include and, conversely, which ALR lands would be most appropriate to exclude. This has been identified as a limitation to the policy as the lack of information requires the City to make decisions based on submitted applications rather than overall benefits to agriculture and the community.

It was noted that, although the policy has helped Surrey maintain a stable ALR boundary, the City has still experienced the loss of agricultural land to non-farm use development within the ALR which does not alter the boundary itself but does remove viable soil from agricultural production.

 

References

City of Surrey, Planning and Development Division, Department of Community Planning, personal communication, October and November 2016

 

 

Topic: Food Production

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, pollinators, livestock

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 1974

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A bylaw to regulate beekpeeing on small and large lots.

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban chickens, livestock

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2016

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A Bylaw to regulate the control and keeping of domestic chickens on residential lots greater than 669 square meters [7,200 sq. ft.] but less than 0.4 hectares [1 acre]. 

Topic: Development and Productive use of Agricultural Land, Economic Development, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: zoning, farm residence maximum setback, farm retail/farm gate sales, agri-tourism, home occupation/home based businesses, siting and coverage, farm worker accommodation, urban gardens/orchard

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Zoning Bylaw | Year: 2009

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
development and productive use of agricultural land; siting and coverage;

See document for siting and coverage regulations for buildings and structures in Agriculture and Golf Zones. 

14.1.5 - 14.1.6
development and productuve use of agricultural land; farm residence maximum setback; No portion of a single detached housing building, including any additional dwelling units, shall be located further than 50.0 m from a constructed public road abutting the property. On a corner lot or double fronting lot, the 50.0 m from a constructed public road abutting the property shall be determined based on the location of the permitted access to the single detached housing building or additional dwelling unit(s). 14.1.6.1
development and productuve use of agricultural land; home occupation/home based business; A home business shall be limited to a maximum floor area of 100.0 m2 and must be located and carried out wholly within the dwelling unit and not an accessory building. 14.1.11.3
economic development; agri-tourism; A bed and breakfast use may have up to four guest accommodation rooms and two facia signs with maximum dimensions of 0.6 m by 1.2 m.  14.1.11.4
development and productive use of agricultural land; farm worker accommodation;

6. Seasonal farm labour accommodation shall only be permitted on:

a) a site zoned AG3;

b) a lot located in the Agricultural Land Reserve;

c) a lot designated for ‘agriculture’ in the General Land Use Map contained in the Official Community Plan; and

d) a lot classified as ‘farm’ under the BC Assessment Act. 7.

The following provisions must be met to permit seasonal farm labour accommodation:

a) minimum farm operation size of 8.09 ha;

b) the seasonal farm labour accommodation must be located on the same lot as an existing single detached housing;

c) only one seasonal farm labour accommodation is permitted per farm operation;

d) a building used for seasonal farm labour accommodation shall not exceed 400.0 m2;

e) a maximum of 40 seasonal farm labour occupants per seasonal farm labour accommodation is permitted; Section 14: Agriculture and Golf Zones 14.1-5 2706166

f) minimum floor area per occupant is to be 10.0 m2 ; and

g) a building used for seasonal farm labour accommodation shall be considered a dwelling with all regulations relating to density, minimum and maximum yards and height to apply.

8. The following limitations apply to seasonal farm labour accommodation:

a) a building used for seasonal farm labour accommodation must adhere to all relevant components of the Building Code and the City’s Building Regulation;

b) a lot that contains a building used for seasonal farm labour accommodation is subject to inspections by the City during any 12 month period to ensure that occupation is in compliance with the regulations contained in this zone;

c) a building used for seasonal farm labour accommodation does not need to be removed when not occupied by seasonal farm labour if the use is required on an ongoing, annual basis for the agricultural purpose of the farm operation;

d) if seasonal farm labour accommodation is no longer required for the farm operation, all buildings used for seasonal farm labour accommodation must be removed and the land restored to its original state; and

e) costs of removal of the seasonal farm labour accommodation building and restoration of land to its original state are to be the responsibility of the property owner.

14.1.11.6-14.1.11.8
food sales, access and procurement;

farm retails/gates sales;

Roadside Stands and Farm-Based Wineries 

.1. A roadside stand that is used for farm retail sales shall: a) have an interior floor area of not more than 93.0 m², except for sites zoned Roadside Stand (CR) which shall have an interior floor area of not more than 190.0 m²; and b) have a use which is accessory to the use of the farm operation upon which the roadside stand is situated.

.2. Farm retail sales at a roadside stand are permitted if: a) all the farm product offered for sale is produced on the farm on which the retail sales are taking place; or b) at least 50% of the retail sales is limited to the sale of farm products produced on the farm on which the retail sales are taking place.

.3. The total area, both indoors and outdoors, used for the retail sales of all products shall not exceed 300.0 m².

.4. The floor area of all farm-based winery buildings and structures shall not exceed the lesser of: a) 1,000.0 m²; or b) a maximum floor area ratio of 0.05”. 

5.10.1-5.10.4

urban agriculture;

urban gardens/orchard;

Uses Permitted in All Zones

...Agriculture is permitted as a secondary use in all zones (i.e., it occurs in conjunction with a principal use, for example single detached housing) in order to encourage and accommodate community gardens, green roofs, vertical farming and other forms of urban agriculture. The following conditions apply in certain instances with respect to agriculture being permitted as a secondary use in all zones:

a) There may be covenants or caveats registered on the title of the land which could restrict the type of agriculture permitted (e.g., prohibition on the raising of chickens, rabbits or other domesticated animals). Property owners and tenants are advised to check their current certificate of title for any covenants or caveats which may be registered and affect the use of the site.

b) Only properties which are assessed as a “farm” under the Assessment Act are permitted to raise livestock. c) A medical marihuana production facility and medical marihuana research and development facility is not permitted.

5.13.4

 

Note: uploaded document includes agricultural zones only, see link to City of Richmond complete zoning bylaw for details of regulations outside of agricultural zones.

Topic: Food Sales, Access & Procurement

Sub-topics: farm retail/farm gate sales

Region: Metro Vancouver | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2003

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
food sales, access and procurement; farm retail/gate sales

Roadside Stand Regulations - all Classes

18.1.1 The operator of any class of roadside stand must not:

(a) sell at retail or display for sale at retail, from or in a building or structure or vehicle, any farm produce, without first obtaining a licence to do so; or

(b) operate any class of roadside stand other than the class for which the licence was issued.

18.1.2 Every roadside stand operator must:

(a) ensure that his roadside stand: (i) has an interior that is easily maintained at all times in a sanitary condition; and (ii) does not create a traffic hazard;

(b) provide sufficient free vehicle parking to ensure that roadside stand customers: (i) are able to park their vehicles clear of all highways; and (ii) are not required to reverse their vehicles onto a highway when leaving such roadside stand;

(c) permit the Licence Inspector or the Building Inspector to enter, at all reasonable times, onto any land and into any buildings, to establish whether the provisions in this bylaw are being obeyed; and

(d) comply with and ensure that all persons assisting or employed in the operation of such roadside stand comply with any provincial regulations governing sanitation and the operation of food premises.

See document for additional regualtions related to roadside stands.

part 18

 

Topic: First Nations and Indigenous Food Systems, Food Production, Food Sales, Access & Procurement, Policy Partnerships, Advocacy & Development, Urban - Agriculture Conflict & Edge Planning, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: zoning, edible landscaping, urban chickens, protection of farming development permit area, pilot project, ALR, climate change and greenhouse gases, partnerships/advocacy/liaising, farmers' markets

Region: Comox Valley | Document Type: Official Community Plan | Year: 2014

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location Language Rating

policy partnerships, advocacy and development;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

Participate in regional initiatives such as the IH Food Security HUB endorsed by Let Us Share the Harvest (LUSH) organization, to develop a more sustainable food system, including food production, processing, transportation, and waste diversion.

6.3.3 (1) *
first nations and indigenous food systems; hunting, fishing and gathering Support opportunities for First Nation partnerships in local food production and ecotourism through wildcrafting and traditional gathering knowledge. 6.3.3 (3) *
food sales, access and procurement; farmers' markets; Support the use of public spaces for farmers markets and community food events. 6.3.3 (4) *
wildlife/environmental/pest managmeent; climate change and greenhouse gases Explore opportunities in the agricultural sector to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and conserve energy by using targets, policies, and actions. 6.3.3 (6)  

food production;

urban agriculture;

edible landscaping;

pilot project;

Seek opportunities to pilot urban food production and edible landscapes in greenways.

6.3.3 (7)

 

 

food production;

urban agriculture;

pilot project;

partnerships/advocacy/liaising;

Consider new and innovative approaches to urban food production that increase food security, in partnership with citizens, community groups, and other stakeholders. 6.3.3 (8)  
food production;   Encourage small-scale, neighbourhood-level food production within the community. 6.3.3 (9)  
development and productive use of agricultural land;   Protect agricultural areas from the incursion of non-food industries such as federally licensed medical marijuana production facilities. 6.3.3 (10) *
urban-agriculture conflict and edge planning;

protection of farming development permit area ;

ALR ;

buffer at agricultural edge;

See document for Protection of Farming Development Permit Area 

10.3

*

 

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: beekeeping/apiculture, pollinators, livestock

Region: North Okanagan | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2006

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A bylaw to regulate the keeping of bees

Topic: Food Production, Urban Agriculture

Sub-topics: urban chickens, livestock

Region: North Okanagan | Document Type: Regulatory Bylaw | Year: 2010

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Topic Sub-topic Policy or Policy Excerpt Document Location
food porduction; livestock;

 The keeping of animals where permitted in the Zoning Bylaw as an agricultural use, shall comply with the following restrictions:

(i) In the A1, A2, A3 zones, as defined in the Zoning Bylaw, where the lot is a ½ acre (.20 ha.) in area or less: three (3) rabbits or three (3) urban hens as regulated in Schedule A, or a combination thereof are permitted.

(ii) In the A1, A2, A3 zones, as defined in the Zoning Bylaw, where the lot is more than ½ acre (.20 ha.) but less than 1 acre (.40 ha.) in PAGE 6 BYLAW NUMBER 5252 area: ten (10) rabbits or ten (10) poultry or a combination thereof are permitted.

(iii) In the A1, A2, A3 and RR zones, as defined in the Zoning Bylaw, where the lot is more than 1 acre (.40 ha.) but less than two acres (.81 ha.) in area: one (1) horse, or one (1) cow, or one (1) sheep, or one (1) other large animal; plus ten (10) rabbits or ten (10) poultry or a combination thereof are permitted.

(iv) In the RR zone, as defined in the Zoning Bylaw, where the lot is or exceeds 2 acres (.81 ha.) in area: not more than two (2) of any of horses, cattle, sheep, or a combination thereof; plus an additional (3) animals consisting of horses, cattle, or sheep, or a combination thereof if temporarily kept as part of an Animal Clinic, Minor or Major as defined in the Zoning Bylaw; plus twenty (20) rabbits or twenty (20) poultry, or a combination thereof are permitted.

(v) In the A1, A2, A3 zones, as defined in the Zoning Bylaw, where the lot is more than 2 acres (.81 ha.) in area, the number of animals and poultry is limited to a reasonable number of animals, to be determined by the poundkeeper acting reasonably, in relation to the primary or secondary uses to which the lot is put. 

2 (c)

food production;

urban agriculture;

livestock;

urban chickens; 

URBAN HEN REGULATIONS

1. No owner shall allow his or her urban hen to run at large.

2. No person shall keep more than 3 hens, except as an agricultural use within an agricultural zone as established by the Zoning Bylaw.

3. An owner of urban hens shall keep them on a lot that has: a) at least one single family detached dwelling on it; b) a frontage of at least 12 meters; and, c) a depth of at least 20 meters.

4. Every owner of urban hens shall provide a coop for the urban hens.

5. All coops shall be located in the rear yard of a lot and shall fully enclose the urban hens and prevent them from escaping. “Chicken tractors” may be used to move urban hens to new areas for foraging during daylight hours.

6. Rear Yard Siting of Coops a) If a property line is 23 meters or more from any neighbouring residential structure, a coop shall be located a minimum of 1 meter from the rear lot line.. b) If a property line is less than 23 meters from a neighbouring residential structure, or the neighbouring lot is vacant, a coop shall be located at least 3 meters from the rear lot line. c) Every coop shall be located at least 3 meters from any side lot line of the lot on which the coop is located. 

7. Every coop shall be designed and constructed to ensure proper ventilation and sufficient space for the urban hens and shall be maintained in accordance with good animal husbandry practices and shall keep all vermin out. Every coop shall be constructed in such a manner that a person may easily access the coop to remove feces, clean nest boxes, and undertake other maintenance of the coop and care of the urban hens.

8. All dead urban hens shall be legally disposed of immediately, and in any event, within 24 hours.

9. No backyard slaughter is allowed.

10. Hygienic storage of and prompt removal of feces is required. No accumulation of more than 1 cubic meter of composted manure is allowed.

11. All types of food supply shall be protected against vermin.

12. No person may keep urban hens unless registered with the Clerk or designate and upon paying the required fees and charges, as outlined in the City’s Fees and Charges Bylaw, as amended from time to time.

13. If the owner of urban hens suspects any urban hen is infected with a communicable disease, the owner shall immediately contain the urban hen or urban hens affected and consult a veterinarian licensed to practice in British Columbia to diagnose the condition. If the diagnosis confirms that the urban hen is infected with a communicable disease, the owner shall immediately notify the Public Health Department of Interior Health and comply with any direction that may be issued by a Public Health Inspector in this regard.

Schedule A