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ENGL 1202 + ENGL 1204

KPU English Students

Recognizing that this is a difficult time for all students, we have added resource links specifically addressing the challenges caused by COVID-19 at the top of our Student Support Page. Students taking online or hybrid Fall 2021 courses are required to have a tablet or computer and access to stable Internet to complete courses and access KPU services. While a smartphone can be used in combination with these devices, it will not meet the requirement on its own. If you can't meet these requirements, you should not be enrolled in an online or hybrid course for the Fall 2021 semester. If you need to withdraw from a course, we recommend you do so by September 6 in order to receive a full refund of tuition fees (view all Dates & Deadlines here).
Important Note: Because of the ongoing Covid pandemic, several sections of English 1202 and 1204 have changed their mode of delivery from in-person to online or to a hybrid model. You should have received a message from your instructor about any changes, but if you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact your instructor.

In both ENGL 1202 and ENGL 1204, students will engage in writing-intensive activities as they analyze literary texts. They will apply literary analysis through close reading, informed discussion, and formal writing.  Most ENGL 1202 sections focus on topics chosen by the individual instructors. ENGL 1204 involves the study of genres (poetry, drama, fiction, etc.) and some instructors of ENGL 1204 have topics as well. NOTE:  This list is subject to change without notice.

ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Fall 2021

Online:

ENGL1202 A10 - Kiran Clements

Quick Lit and Questioning It. We dispense with heavy novels and focus on literary works that can be read in less than a day (often in less than an hour!) and ask ourselves: "Can a short work be a literary masterpiece?"

ENGL1202 A11 - Deborah Blenkhorn

Love in the Time of Cholera. We are borrowing the title of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's timeless novel to encapsulate our course theme, which has to do with understanding, through literary depictions from the past, the metaphorical resonance of health for the challenging times we face in our lives today.

ENGL1202 A12 - Andrew Bartlett

Human-Animal Stories. Cats and dogs at home, song birds in the sky, creatures wild in oceans and forests, others kept on farms or captive in zoos --- our human lives have always included and overlapped with the lives of animals. This section focuses on literature about human-animal relationships, stories and poems from various countries and continents. The texts are mostly short and almost all of them use modern English.

ENGL1202 A13 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL1202 A14 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL1202 A15 - Andrew Barlett

Human-Animal Stories. Cats and dogs at home, song birds in the sky, creatures wild in oceans and forests, others kept on farms or captive in zoos --- our human lives have always included and overlapped with the lives of animals. This section focuses on literature about human-animal relationships, stories and poems from various countries and continents. The texts are mostly short and almost all of them use modern English.

ENGL1202 A16 - Blair Hemstock

The Shock of the New. Modernism was born when institutions no longer were trusted, and traditional behaviour no longer applied.

ENGL1202 A17 - Elizabeth Gooding

People and Other Animals. Whether they are companions, antagonists, symbols, or food, animals play significant roles in our lives. In this section of English 1202, we’ll explore a range of animal-populated literary texts.

ENGL1202 A18 - Elizabeth Gooding

People and Other Animals. Whether they are companions, antagonists, symbols, or food, animals play significant roles in our lives. In this section of English 1202, we’ll explore a range of animal-populated literary texts.

Richmond Campus:

ENGL1202 R10 - Gillian Bright - Switched to online (synchronous)

Reading and Writing about Ghost Stories. Through reading drama, poetry, short stories, and novels that span 500 years of creative production, we will gain an understanding of how literature has imagined the idea of being haunted. We will consider how different historical periods and events impacted the way writers thought about ghosts, and we will question the various functions ghosts and haunting served. Are literary specters merely for our chilling entertainment, or are they manifestations of something else? Are ghosts shadows of the mind? Visions of the spirit world? Forgotten remnants of history? This course will pursue these mysteries—from ghostly graveyards to haunted houses.

ENGL1202 R11 - Kegan Doyle - Switched to partially online

Rebel, Rebel. In this section, we will focus on poems, songs, stories, films, and plays by, about, and for rebels. We will discuss rebels without causes and rebels with them, political rebels, hip hop rebels, rock and roll rebels, religious rebels, and artistic rebels. This course is also a broad-based introduction to fiction, poetry, and drama. As this is a literature course, our focus will inevitably be on the artistry of the short stories, poems, and plays we read.   But it will also be on literature’s relationship to our own lives, to the world we see around us, and to the stories we tell about ourselves and each other.

Langley Campus:

ENGL1202 L10 - Heather Ladd - Switched to online (synchronous)

Journeys and Homecomings. Home is where the journey begins and (sometimes) ends. This course explores narratives of travel and conceptions of home within imaginative works from several literary traditions. We will read an abridged English translation of Homer’s The Odyssey as well as an innovative dramatic adaptation of this foundational work, Father Comes Home from the Wars by the Black American playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Skills classes interspersed throughout the semester will guide you through the process of planning, writing, and editing an academic essay. 

Surrey Campus:

ENGL1202 S11 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society.  Through discussions of short stories, a play and other genres we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL1202 S12 - Brian Swail

Mything You. We often think of myths as stories told by ancient people to explain the world, simple fictions they needed because they weren’t clever and didn’t have iPhones. I want to suggest that myths continue to be fundamental to how we understand the world, ourselves, and those around us. We will look at some early narratives before turning to modern revisions of some very old stories. 

ENGL1202 S13 - Heather Cyr - Switched to online (synchronous)

Double Lives. In this course we will investigate the theme of “double lives” in works of several different genres including the short story, the graphic novel, and the novel. We’ll examine how these works construct unique characters who live double lives, how people create, maintain and attempt to reconcile multiple selves and why these double lives are often seen as assets or threats. Looking at authors such as Robert Louis Stevenson, Shaun Tan, and Julia Alvarez, we will discuss the relationship between genre and the construction of character, emphasizing how the works we study are the historical product of a specific time and place even though they often have universal themes that transcend that. Throughout the term, we will also consider how the literature we read addresses the recurring concerns of gender, race, and class identity as they relate to our theme of “double lives.”

ENGL1202 S14 - John Rupert - Switched to online (asynchronous)

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.​

ENGL1202 S16 - Kim Larsen (switched to partially online)

Writing on the Edge: Madness, murder, obsessive desire. Come join us as we explore stories and poems that deal with extreme or abnormal states of mind, analyzing the ways in which these texts portray the potential monstrosity that lurks just beneath the surface of rational humanity.

ENGL1202 S18 - Kim Larsen (switched to partially online)

Writing on the Edge: Madness, murder, obsessive desire. Come join us as we explore stories and poems that deal with extreme or abnormal states of mind, analyzing the ways in which these texts portray the potential monstrosity that lurks just beneath the surface of rational humanity.

ENGL1202 S19 - Cara Headley (switched partially online)

ENGL1207 S10 - Paul Tyndall - (switched to partially online)


ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Summer 2021*

Please note that KPU continues to take measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a result, there will be no in-person classes offered for Spring 2021. All Spring 2021 classes will be delivered remotely. The classes listed below indicate campus locations for enrollment purposes only; students should expect to take the courses below remotely, and they will need to have access to a tablet, laptop, or personal computer, and access to the Internet via WIFI or other source, to complete the course and access KPU services.

ENGL1202 A10 - Greg Chan

Grey Matters. Gandalf the Grey said it best: “For even the very wise cannot see all ends.” Grey, the colour associated with compromise, impartiality, old souls, and seriousness, plays a dynamic role in literature. In this section of ENGL 1202, students will explore morally grey characters, grey symbolism, grey settings, and grey areas across a series of novels, short stories, films, and plays.

ENGL1202 A11 - Greg Chan

Grey Matters. Gandalf the Grey said it best: “For even the very wise cannot see all ends.” Grey, the colour associated with compromise, impartiality, old souls, and seriousness, plays a dynamic role in literature. In this section of ENGL 1202, students will explore morally grey characters, grey symbolism, grey settings, and grey areas across a series of novels, short stories, films, and plays.

ENGL1202 A12 - N. P. Kennedy

The Other Shakespeare. Shakespeare wrote plays. Now plays, novels, films and manga are written about him. Study a variety of artworks that all do something to, with, or about Shakespeare: lover, fool, villain, hero.

ENGL1202 A13 - Ranjini Mendis

Literary Journeys. In this asynchronous section of ENGL 1202 on the topic of 'Literary Journeys,' we will read about virtual, real, and metaphorical journeys -- and how they affect characters in a variety of ways. You will be given many opportunities to improve your writing skills as you engage in close reading of selected literature and express your views, through informal forum responses, formal analysis, and interpretative writing.

ENGL1202 A14 - Ranjini Mendis

Literary Journeys. In this asynchronous section of ENGL 1202 on the topic of 'Literary Journeys,' we will read about virtual, real, and metaphorical journeys -- and how they affect characters in a variety of ways. You will be given many opportunities to improve your writing skills as you engage in close reading of selected literature and express your views, through informal forum responses, formal analysis, and interpretative writing.

ENGL1204 A10 - Mark Cochrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works (by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others) that expose the structures of power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships arise. At the same time, these texts explore love as projection, illusion, interpellation, fantasy—as a product of the roles that culture invites individuals to play, in dynamics both imaginary and real.​

ENGL1204 A11 - Mark Cochrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works (by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others) that expose the structures of power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships arise. At the same time, these texts explore love as projection, illusion, interpellation, fantasy—as a product of the roles that culture invites individuals to play, in dynamics both imaginary and real.​


 

ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Spring 2021*

Please note that KPU continues to take measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a result, there will be no in-person classes offered for Spring 2021. All Spring 2021 classes will be delivered remotely. The classes listed below indicate campus locations for enrollment purposes only; students should expect to take the courses below remotely, and they will need to have access to a tablet, laptop, or personal computer, and access to the Internet via WIFI or other source, to complete the course and access KPU services.

ENGL1202 A10 - Geoffrey MacDonald

Magic Realism. Magic realism uses the supernatural to shape and reshape our view(s) of the world. Looking at drama, poetry, and fiction from Aotearoa/New Zealand, Africa, the Caribbean, India, and Indigenous North America, we will consider how magic realist literature broadens our understanding of spirituality, justice, history, belonging, and kinship.

ENGL1202 A11 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL1202 A12 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society. Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL1202 A13 - Andrew Bartlett

Human-Animal Stories. Cats and dogs at home, song birds in the sky, creatures wild in oceans and forests, others kept on farms or captive in zoos--our human lives have always included and overlapped with the lives of animals. This section focuses on literature about human-animal relationships, stories and poems from various countries and continents. The texts are mostly short and almost all of them use modern English.

ENGL1202 A14 - Lindsey Seatter

A Woman’s Place. Revising, Resisting, and the Rise of Feminism in Romantic Literature.

ENGL1202 A15 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL1202 A16 - Andrew Bartlett

Human-Animal Stories. Cats and dogs at home, song birds in the sky, creatures wild in oceans and forests, others kept on farms or captive in zoos--our human lives have always included and overlapped with the lives of animals. This section focuses on literature about human-animal relationships, stories and poems from various countries and continents. The texts are mostly short and almost all of them use modern English.

ENGL1202 A17 - Robert Dearle

Stranger Things. In this section of 1202 we will read stories, plays, and poems that pierce the surface of everyday reality to explore fantastic worlds, weird beings, and hidden possibilities. Strange times call for strange literature!

ENGL1202 A18 - N.P. Kennedy

The Other Shakespeare. Shakespeare wrote plays. Now plays, novels, films and manga are written about him. Study a variety of artworks that all do something to, with, or about Shakespeare: lover, fool, villain, hero.

ENGL1202 A19 - Leanne MacDonald

The Once and Future King Arthur. According to the inscription on his tomb in Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte Darthur, King Arthur is known as the "Once and Future King." While his literal return seems unlikely, storytellers continue to resurrect the mythical king in new contexts. In this class, we will explore ways in which literary works dating from the Middle Ages to the present use King Arthur and his world to discuss what makes a "good" society--and what happens when society fails to live up to these ideals. In the final unit, we will also examine how contemporary authors and filmmakers use Arthurian legend to explore contemporary notions of race, gender, sexuality, ability, and other aspects of identity.

ENGL1202 A20 - Elizabeth Gooding

People and Other Animals. Whether they are companions, antagonists, symbols, or food, animals play significant roles in our lives. In this section of English 1202, we'll explore a range of animal-populated literary texts.

ENGL1202 A21 - Paul Ohler

TBA

ENGL1202 A22 - John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

ENGL1202 A23 - John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

ENGL1202 A24 - Paul Ostrowski

Students will engage in writing-intensive activities as they analyze selected literary texts. They will apply skills of literary analysis to literature through close reading, informed discussion, and formal writing.

ENGL1202 A25 - Robert Pasquini

Representing Nature. Literary representations of the natural world are rarely neutral. This course will examine contemporary and historical texts that highlight the ways in which authors utilize (and manipulate) concepts of nature to diverse ends as they respond to issues including activism, animality, extinction, habitat, or resilience. By determining the beliefs, desires, or fears informing these narratives of nature, we will, in turn, reveal the nature of narrative.

ENGL1202 A26 - Ranjini Mendis

Literary Journeys. In this asynchronous section of ENGL 1202 on the topic of 'Literary Journeys,' we will read a literary selection featuring physical, metaphorical, and imaginary journeys--and how experiences change (or don't change) characters. You will be given many opportunities to improve your writing skills as you engage in close reading and express your views through informal reader-responses, formal analysis, and interpretative writing.

ENGL1202 A27 - Ranjini Mendis

Literary Journeys. In this asynchronous section of ENGL 1202 on the topic of 'Literary Journeys,' we will read a literary selection featuring physical, metaphorical, and imaginary journeys--and how experiences change (or don't change) characters. You will be given many opportunities to improve your writing skills as you engage in close reading and express your views through informal reader-responses, formal analysis, and interpretative writing.

ENGL1202 A28 - Jennifer Hardwick

Literatures of Protest and Resistance. Stories are foundational to who we are; they are how we come to understand ourselves, each other, and the world around us. Through a close examination of contemporary North American literature and media this section of 1202 will explore how individuals and communities use stories to challenge power structures, demand justice, and seek personal and collective rights. We will think closely and critically about stories we are taught, stories that are silenced, and stories that could change the world.

ENGL1202 A29 - Paul Tyndall

The Great War in Literature and Film. In this section of ENGL 1202, we will read and discuss poems, short stories, essays and films written during or inspired by World War One. In reflecting on these texts, we will consider how this conflict, which ended more than one hundred years ago, changed modern society and modern literature, and why it continues to fascinate readers, writers, artists, historians and filmmakers to this day.

ENGL1204 A10 - Betty Anne Buirs

Literary Analysis: Unplugged. No tantalizing literary topics. Just the nuts and bolts. In this section of 1204, we'll discuss how to analyze stories, plays, and poems as well as how to write about them--clearly, concisely, and persuasively. 

ENGL1204 A11 - Betty Anne Buirs

Literary Analysis: Unplugged. No tantalizing literary topics. Just the nuts and bolts. In this section of 1204, we'll discuss how to analyze stories, plays, and poems as well as how to write about them--clearly, concisely, and persuasively. 

ENGL1204 A12 - Deborah Blenkhorn

Genre, Gender, Generation: An Introduction to Poetry, Fiction, and Drama. In a changing world, how can literature help us to understand ourselves and others? Can previous generations of diverse writers help on the journey? Join us on a voyage of self-discovery through classic literature as we uncover the essentials of writing about poems, stories and plays at the university level.

ENGL1204 A13 - Mark Cochrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works (by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others) that expose the structures of power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships arise. At the same time, these texts explore love as projection, illusion, interpellation, fantasy—as a product of the roles that culture invites individuals to play, in dynamics both imaginary and real.

ENGL1204 A14 - Wendy Smith

Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, you will learn how to analyze literary texts and develop skills and techniques for writing about literature.

ENGL1204 A15 - Wendy Smith

Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, you will learn how to analyze literary texts and develop skills and techniques for writing about literature.

ENGL1204 A16 - Deborah Blenkhorn

Genre, Gender, Generation: An Introduction to Poetry, Fiction, and Drama. In a changing world, how can literature help us to understand ourselves and others? Can previous generations of diverse writers help on the journey? Join us on a voyage of self-discovery through classic literature as we uncover the essentials of writing about poems, stories and plays at the university level.

ENGL1204 A17 - John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.


ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Fall 2020*

Please note that KPU continues to take measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a result, there will be no in-person classes offered for the Fall 2020. All Fall 2020 classes will be delivered remotely. The classes listed below indicate campus locations for enrollment purposes only; students should expect to take the courses below remotely, and they will need to have access to a tablet, laptop, or personal computer, and access to the Internet via WIFI or other source, to complete the course and access KPU services.

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, we will look at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL 1202 R11 - Gillian Bright

The Outcast Figure. When “mainstream” society excludes certain groups or individuals, what values get reinforced? What strategies are used to debase the outcast, and how do outcasts resist devaluation? In this course, we will consider the competing feelings of desire and disgust towards outcast figures in novels, short stories, fairy tales, poems, and television programs. We will develop a nuanced understanding of how those who are excluded may prove fundamental to the identities of those who exclude.

ENGL 1202 R12 - Paul Ostrowski

ENGL 1202 R13 - Elizabeth Gooding

People and Other Animals. Whether they are companions, antagonists, symbols, or food, animals play significant roles in our lives. In this section of English 1202, we’ll explore a range of animal-populated literary texts.

ENGL 1202 R14 - Paul Ostrowski

ENGL 1202 R15 - Gillian Bright

The Outcast Figure. When “mainstream” society excludes certain groups or individuals, what values get reinforced? What strategies are used to debase the outcast, and how do outcasts resist devaluation? In this course, we will consider the competing feelings of desire and disgust towards outcast figures in novels, short stories, fairy tales, poems, and television programs. We will develop a nuanced understanding of how those who are excluded may prove fundamental to the identities of those who exclude.

ENGL 1202 R16 - Andrew Bartlett

Human-Animal Stories. Cats and dogs at home, song birds in the sky, creatures wild in oceans and forests, others kept on farms or captive in zoos --- our human lives have always included and overlapped with the lives of animals. This section focuses on literature about human-animal relationships, stories and poems from various countries and continents. The texts are mostly short and almost all of them use modern English.

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10 - John Rupert

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

ENGL 1202 S11 - Gavin Paul

The Literature of End Times. This course seeks to connect the current fascination with apocalyptic scenarios in popular culture--unstoppable plagues, cataclysmic wars, natural disasters, merciless invaders--to a survey of highly readable texts from the past 400 years.​​

ENGL 1202 S12 - TBA

ENGL 1202 S13 - Paul Ohler

ENGL 1202 S14 - Jennifer Hardwick

Stories of Resistance. Through a close examination of contemporary North American literature and media, this section of 1202 will explore how individuals and communities use stories to challenge power structures, demand justice, and seek personal and collective rights. We will think closely and critically about  stories we are taught, stories that are silenced, and stories that could change the world.

ENGL 1202 S15 - Kim Larsen

Writing on the Edge: Madness, murder, obsessive desire. Come join us as we explore stories and poems that deal with extreme or abnormal states of mind, analyzing the ways in which these texts portray the potential monstrosity that lurks just beneath the surface of rational humanity.

ENGL 1202 S16 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society. Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL 1202 S17 - Kim Larsen

Writing on the Edge: Madness, murder, obsessive desire. Come join us as we explore stories and poems that deal with extreme or abnormal states of mind, analyzing the ways in which these texts portray the potential monstrosity that lurks just beneath the surface of rational humanity.

ENGL 1202 S18 - Leanne MacDonald

The Once and Future King Arthur. According to medieval legend, King Arthur is known as the “Once and Future King.” While we may not be holding our breath for his literal return, it is clear that writers and artists will continue to resurrect the legendary king in their storytelling. In this class, we will analyze poetry, fiction, drama, film, television, and graphic novels from the Middle Ages to the present. We will explore how these texts use King Arthur and his world to discuss ideas about what makes a “good” society and what happens when that society fails to live up to our expectations. From the vantage point of 2020, we will also examine how authors and filmmakers use Arthurian legend to represent contemporary notions of race, gender, neurodiversity, sexuality, and other aspects of identity.

ENGL 1202 S50 - TBA

ENGL 1204 S10 - Wendy Smith

Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, you will learn how to analyze literary texts and develop skills and techniques for writing about literature.

ENGL 1207 - Paul Tyndall

Film, Television, and Online Narratives.

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10 - Brian Swail

The Grand Tour. A great work of literature can transport you to unexpected places. We will look at a sample of several centuries worth of great works (with suspects both usual and unusual) – pack your bags!

ENGL 1202 L11 - TBA

ENGL 1202 L12 - TBA

Civic Plaza

ENGL 1202 P10 - Greg Chan

Grey Matters. Gandalf the Grey said it best: “For even the very wise cannot see all ends.” Grey, the colour associated with compromise, impartiality, old souls, and seriousness, plays a dynamic role in literature. In this section of ENGL 1202, students will explore morally grey characters, grey symbolism, grey settings, and grey areas across a series of short stories, novels, essays, and films.

ENGL 1202 P11 - TBA

Online Courses

ENGL 1202 A75 - Ranjini Mendis

In this fully online section of ENGL 1202 on the topic of The Journey and The Traveler, we will read a literary selection on physical, imaginary, and metaphorical journeys -- and how people change (or don't) through their experiences. You will engage in writing-intensive activities as you analyze a topic or theme in selected literary texts and apply skills of literary analysis through reader-response, close reading, interpretation, and formal writing. 

ENGL 1202 A76 - Deborah Blenkhorn

Literature and Life: An Introduction to Poetry, Fiction, and Drama. Have you ever wondered about the relevance of literature to your life, your interests, your future?  This course aims to help you use those connections to understand classic literary works, while covering the essentials of writing about poems, stories and plays at the university level.


ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Summer 2020*

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10 - Kirsten Alm

Migration, Memory and Being in Literatures of the West Coast. In this class, we will read and discuss literature which explores how individuals find—or do not find—ways to be at home on the West Coast. Beginning with translations of stories from the Haida and the Stó:lõ Coast Salish peoples and finishing with contemporary literature by authors including Madeleine Thien and Fred Wah, we will investigate how personal and cultural experience and expectation conditions the way individuals perceive and respond to place.

ENGL 1202 R11 - TBA

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10 - Mark Cochrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works (by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others) that expose the structures of power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships arise. At the same time, these texts explore love as projection, illusion, interpellation, fantasy—as a product of the roles that culture invites individuals to play, in dynamics both imaginary and real.​

ENGL 1202 S11 - Mark Cochrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works (by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others) that expose the structures of power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships arise. At the same time, these texts explore love as projection, illusion, interpellation, fantasy—as a product of the roles that culture invites individuals to play, in dynamics both imaginary and real.​

ENGL 1204 S10 - TBA

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10 - Steve Weber

War Literature. In these times of constant sabre-rattling, manipulative fear-mongering, and interminable wars, a democratic people ignores war narratives at its peril. While reading some of the best war literature of the twentieth century, students in this course will begin to understand what it might be like to live through war.

Civic Plaza

ENGL 1202 P10 - Greg Chan

Grey Matters. Gandalf the Grey said it best: “For even the very wise cannot see all ends.” Grey, the colour associated with compromise, impartiality, old souls, and seriousness, plays a dynamic role in literature. In this section of ENGL 1202, students will explore morally grey characters, grey symbolism, grey settings, and grey areas across a series of short stories, novels, essays, and films.


ENGL 1202 and 1204 Topics for Spring 2020*

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10 - Gillian Bright

Ghost Stories. From chilling apparitions to mysterious phantoms, ghosts have populated literature for centuries. We will consider the cultural and historical significance of ghosts, exploring the hidden meanings of “haunted” poems, plays, short stories, and novels.

ENGL 1202 R11 - Paul Ostrowski

Relationships and Conflicts. Conflict is central to all forms of art. Whether in music, visual arts or Literature, conflict provides the necessary “energy” to compel our attention. This course will examine the role of conflict in poetry, short fiction, and drama; we will focus on different forms of conflict and their role in the development of tone, plot, and character.

ENGL 1202 R12 - Elizabeth Gooding

Must Love Trees: Looking at the Natural World. What does literature suggest about our connection to nature—or our disconnection from it? Bring your metaphorical hiking boots as we explore poems, stories, essays, a novel, and documentaries that address this question.

ENGL 1202 R13 - Duncan Greenlaw

Creative Destruction. Through Camus, Beckett, Plath, Ginsberg, Hamsun, and other writers, this course looks at how people refuse to conform—or fail to conform—to societal norms, and how new codes and beliefs are re-built from the wreckage of old ones.

ENGL 1202 R14 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society.  Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10 - Kelly Doyle

Contemporary Horror. Why do we love horror stories? Critically examine the horror genre via comics, graphic novels, short fiction, and film/television clips/viewings in this class. Via monsters, zombies, and more, we’ll discuss sexuality and gender, class and race, nature versus civilization, liminality, and how monsters/humans are defined. 3 seats reserved for International students. Reserves to be lifted March 20.

ENGL 1202 S11 - Leanne Macdonald

The Middle Ages in Contemporary Culture. Although their own stories take place many centuries in the past, legendary heroes like Hua Mulan, King Arthur, Salah ad-Din, and Robin Hood have a habit of resurfacing whenever we need them to help us tell stories about who we are today. In this course, we will examine the concept of 'medievalism' by considering contemporary texts, film, and television that engage with the Middle Ages alongside medieval literature in order to analyze how authors and filmmakers use an imagined version of the medieval era to grapple with modern issues.

ENGL 1202 S12 - Gavin Paul

The Literature of End Times. This course seeks to connect the current fascination with apocalyptic scenarios in popular culture--unstoppable plagues, cataclysmic wars, natural disasters, merciless invaders--to a survey of highly readable texts from the past 400 years.​

ENGL 1202 S13 - Robert Pasquini

Representing Nature. Literary representations of the natural world are rarely neutral. This course will examine contemporary and historical texts that highlight the ways in which authors utilize (and manipulate) concepts of nature to diverse ends as they respond to issues including activism, animality, extinction, habitat, or resilience. By determining the beliefs, desires, or fears informing these narratives of nature, we will, in turn, reveal the nature of narrative.

ENGL 1202 S17 - N.P. Kennedy

The Other Shakespeare. Shakespeare wrote plays. Now plays, novels, films and manga are written about him.  Study a variety of artworks that all do something to with or about Shakespeare: lover, fool, villain, hero. 

ENGL 1202 S18 - Bryn Jones Square

Books, Brains, and Benevolence. This course will explore how the perspective-taking facilitated by literature, film, and television can be used as a powerful tool for addressing urgent social justice issues and for coping with mental illness. We will read texts about climate change, human and animal rights, AI, depression, loneliness, and more and investigate why the study of literature is not only meaningful but also relevant to our lived experience.

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10 - Gaye Hickman-Barr

Voices Across Continents. Listen to four women writers from four different continents re-defining the notion of the writer's authority. We analyze the use of the double voice, hear echoes of oral practices and read their subversion of patriarchy.

Online Courses

ENGL 1202 A75 - Ranjini Mendis

The Journey and The Traveler. This fully online section will feature physical, imaginary, and metaphorical journeys, and how people change (or don't) through their experiences. You will be given plenty of opportunity to develop your expository, interpretive, and analytical skills.


ENGL1202 and 1204 Topics for Fall 2019*

Richmond Campus

ENGL 1202 R10 - Jennifer Williams

Don't Tell Me What to Think: Resistance and Conformity in Literature. Explore individuals’ struggles to be true to themselves and how they come to an understanding of their role in society. Through discussions of poems, plays, and short stories, we will investigate what influences perceptions of self and others.

ENGL 1202 R11 - Elizabeth Gooding

Must Love Trees: Looking at the Natural World. What does literature suggest about our connection to nature—or our disconnection from it? Bring your metaphorical hiking boots as we explore poems, stories, essays, a novel, and documentaries that address this question.

ENGL 1202 R12 - Andrew Bartlett

Animal Stories, Animal Songs. Cow and bear, mongoose and snake, cat and dog, elephant, eagle, and whale. Storytellers and poets have always marvelled at the power, beauty, and mysterious nature of nonhuman animals.  This section explores texts that focus on the relationships between us and the nonhuman creatures with whom we share the world.

ENGL 1202 R13 - Gillian Bright

Ghost Stories. From chilling apparitions to mysterious phantoms, ghosts have populated literature for centuries. We will consider the cultural and historical significance of ghosts, exploring the hidden meanings of “haunted” poems, plays, short stories, and novels.

ENGL 1202 R50 - Mark Cockrane

Love and Power. “How do people get power over one another?” asks Anne Carson’s book The Beauty of the Husband. This course will feature literary works—by Edith Wharton, David Henry Hwang, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, and others—that expose the structures of social and cultural power within which, and in resistance to which, love relationships rise and fall.

ENGL 1204 R11 - Paul Ostrowski

Conflict. Conflict is central to all forms of art. Whether in music, visual arts or Literature, conflict provides the necessary “energy” to compel our attention. This course will examine the role of conflict in poetry, short fiction, and drama; we will focus on different forms of conflict and their role in the development of tone, plot, and character.

Surrey Campus

ENGL 1202 S10 - Leanne Macdonald 

Who’s Passing for Who? In this course, we will explore the ways in which literary figures negotiate their own identities as they cross or challenge categorical boundaries of race, gender, sexuality, class, and even humanity. From disguised fairies and cross-dressing heroines in Chaucer and Shakespeare to body-snatchers in Jordan Peele’s Get Out, we will examine different examples of the perennial theme of passing in works ranging across several centuries and genres.​ 

 

ENGL 1202 S11 - Paul Tyndall

 

The Great W​ar in Literature and Film. In this course, we will explore the impact of World War One on modern literature and modern society by studying poems, short stories and films inspired by the so-called "Great War." This course is part of the Zed Cred program, which means there are no textbook costs. All of the texts will be posted on the course website.

 

ENGL 1202 S12 - Kirsten Alm

 

Indigenous and Diasporic Resistance. In this course, we will read and discuss essays, short fiction, and poetry by writers affected by colonialism and migration. We will explore their critique of the political and social “script” prepared for them by the dominant, Euro-American culture of North America as well as by others within their own cultural group. We will then examine how they have navigated and negotiated boundaries and borders between cultures.

 

ENGL 1202 S13 - John Rupert

 

Satan, Sex, and Demoniacs. Enter, if you dare, a realm where demons attack and destroy the powerful and vulnerable: aristocrats and intellects, lovers, loners, and families! Let us explore how masters of horror represent demonic possession in poetry, fiction, and film.

 

ENGL 1204 S10 - Wendy Smith

 

Through the study of short stories, poems, and plays, you will learn how to analyze literary texts and develop skills and techniques for writing about literature.

 

ENGL 1204 S11 - TBA

 

Langley Campus

ENGL 1202 L10 - Gaye Hickman-Barr

Voice from Four Continents! Listen to four women writers from four different continents re-defining the notion of the writer's authority. We analyze the use of the double voice, hear echoes of oral practices and read their subversion of patriarchy

ENGL 1202 L11 - Kirsten Alm

Indigenous and Diasporic Resistance. In this course, we will read and discuss essays, short fiction, and poetry by writers affected by colonialism and migration. We will explore their critique of the political and social “script” prepared for them by the dominant, Euro-American culture of North America as well as by others within their own cultural group. We will then examine how they have navigated and negotiated boundaries and borders between cultures.

ENGL 1204 L10 - Brian Swail

The Grand Tour. A great work of literature can transport you to unexpected places. We will look at a sample of several centuries worth of great works (with suspects both usual and unusual) – pack your bags!

Online Courses

ENGL 1202 A75 - Ranjini Mendis

The Journey and the Traveler. This fully online section of the regular 1202 course will feature physical, psychological, and metaphorical journeys and their impact on characters you will meet in selected short stories and novels. You will have many opportunities to develop your analytical, expository, and interpretive skills.


*More topics may be announced in the coming weeks

All prerequisite waivers for ENGL classes must be approved by the Chair of English, Dr. Robert Dearle. Please contact him by email: Robert.Dearle@kpu.ca.