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Future Course Offerings

KPU English Department

2000-4000 Level Courses

On this page, you'll find our 2000-4000 level course offerings for the upcoming semesters, as well as specific topics for 2000-4000 level courses being offered in the upcoming semester. English courses at the 2000 level are accessible to all students who have completed six first-year English course credits (or their equivalent). English courses at the 3000 and 4000 level are accessible to students who meet the prerequisite(s) for the courses. For more information about the Bachelor of Arts in English Major and Minor programs click here.


Fall 2023: 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change. Please note that several are courses in development that are tentatively planned. More Fall courses will be added here soon! 

ENGL2342 Folklore and Fairy Tales Across Cultures (Brian Swail) 
ENGL2316 English Literature: 14th to 18th Centuries (John Rupert)
ENGL2250 Approaches to Literary Study (TBA); this proposed course is in development
ENGL3314 Medieval Literature (Leanne MacDonald); this proposed course is in development
ENGL3332 Victorian Poetry and Prose (Robert Pasquini) 
ENGL3304 Canadian Drama (Dale Tracy) 
ENGL3305 Film Theory (Paul Tyndall) 
ENGL3313 Major Authors: Jane Austen (Lindsey Seatter)
ENGL3345 Diasporic Literatures (Kris Singh)
ENGL3367 Asian (Mis)Representation in Film (Greg Chan); this proposed course is in development
ENGL4409 Topics in Literature of the United States (Paul Ohler) 


Summer 2023: 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change. Course descriptions are coming soon.

ENGL2309 Literature of the United States of America (Steve Weber)

ENGL2330 Studies in Drama (N.P. Kennedy)

ENGL2350 Critical Studies in Film (Kegan Doyle)

ENGL3317 Readings in the History of Ideas (Robert Pasquini)

ENGL3321 English Renaissance Drama, Excluding Shakespeare (Gavin Paul)

ENGL3350 Literature on Film (Greg Chan)

ENGL3380 Popular Writing and Culture (Kelly Doyle)

ENGL4420 Topics in British Literature (Leanne MacDonald)


Spring 2023: 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change. Course descriptions are coming soon.

ENGL 2200 Foundations of Western Literature (In Person) - Gavin Paul

Dangerous Knowledge, Dangerous Journeys. This course will explore some of the enduring pathways of Western storytelling. From Homer’s Odyssey to stories in the Judeo-Christian tradition, and from Icelandic sagas to the end of The Road, we will consider the influential myths and legends that continue to shape literature and popular culture. Humans have always dared to push the limits of their knowledge, but at what cost?

ENGL 2315 The Comic Voice (Online Synch) - N.P. Kennedy

Why would one person mock another? Out of affection? Spite? To ridicule tired ideas or incompetent art? To attack injustice or evil? For the grim joy of hurting other people? One aim of this course is to familiarize students with a number of comic works of art—or to deepen their familiarity with them, and thus add to their intellectual horizons. Deeper understanding should foster greater pleasure, so the course will try to live up to the claim, repeated over and over, from ancient Rome to Vaudeville, “to entertain and to edify.” Another great aim of the course is to help students continue to grow in strength and clarity as thinkers and as writers.

ENGL 2317 English Literature: 18th to 20th Centuries (In Person) - Gillian Bright

Students will study representative works of English literature from the 18th to 20th centuries within their social, cultural, political, historical, aesthetic, and/or religious contexts. We will ask how these various contexts have impacted the literary arts. How, for instance, did the massive industrialization of the eighteenth century impact poets’ concerns about nature, or about an individual’s place in a rapidly changing environment? How did an increasing awareness of social inequity find its way into nineteenth century fiction? How did twentieth century writers adapt literary forms as a means of coping with a fractured world, torn by war, colonization, and secularism? These questions ultimately direct us to understand how literature both mirrors the world of its time and inserts new meaning into the contemporary imagination. 

ENGL 2340 Studies in Fiction (In Person) - Jennifer Williams

Students will study various fictional forms. They will study works from a wide variety of genres such as romance, realism, science fiction or fantasy, the mystery or gothic novel, the modern, postmodern, or cyberpunk novel, drawn from different times and different socio-cultural contexts.

ENGL 3300 Critical Theory (In Person) - Paul Ohler

ENGL 3300 introduces students to debates that have persisted for more than 2000 years among philosophers, writers, and critics over the following kinds of questions: What is the nature, function, and value of literature? How can we deal objectively with literary art? How can readers gain greater access to the richness and complexity of literary texts? What do we mean when we speak of the “beauty” of a literary work? Does literary language differ from ordinary language? The course emphasizes the continuity of key ideas in the history of criticism, as well as the gradual displacement of concepts such as “greatness,” and “beauty” Beginning with Aristotle's Poetics, the course will consider these questions in the context of key works of literary theory and criticism.

ENGL 3301 19th-Century Canadian Literature in English (In Person) - Jennifer Hardwick

Cultivating Canada: Stories that Build Nations: The 19th Century was a time of change, violence, growth, alliance, and transition that came to define the the territories we now call Canada. Through a close engagement with key literary texts and historical documents, we will examine competing identities, values, and goals associated with the establishment of Canada, and explore how founding mythologies continue to impact us today.

ENGL 3309 Literature of the United States:1945 to the Present (Online Synch) - Joakim Nilsson 

Escape Routes: What would you do if the American Dream--a good career, marriage, a home full of shiny things--proves empty and oppressive? Can you change the system from inside, or change yourself while remaining inside the system, and if not, what does an effective escape look like? In ENGL 3309, we will explore a variety of novels, short stories, and films that portray characters escaping from social norms involving race, class, gender, sexuality, and mainstream models of success defined by consumerism.

ENGL 3311 Shakespearean Afterlives (Blended Synch) - Paul Tyndall

In this course, we will study the diverse ways that Shakespeare’s poems and plays continue to speak to contemporary audiences through adaptations and appropriations in film, television, literature and the visual arts. In addition to exploring the relationship between the original Shakespearean texts and their many afterlives, we will also consider what is involved in translating his work from one medium or art form to another, and the unique place that Shakespeare continues to occupy in world literature and popular culture. This course will be offered partially online.

ENGL3325 Eighteenth-Century British Literature (In Person) - Heather Ladd

This course is an in-depth survey of the literature produced in the British in the long eighteenth century (1688-1815). To navigate this culturally dynamic period, we will use the anchoring concepts of satire and sensibility: two modes of Enlightenment expression that seem to war for prominence over the decades of our course. Our goal will be to refine our understanding of the long eighteenth century by explaining and reconciling this central “conflict” between literary ideals in a period that straddles both the Age of Reason and the Age of Sensibility. The expansive nature of this survey will allow us to chart the development and progression of many forms, genres, and themes within the period. As we examine a selection of works of poetry, prose, and drama, we will likewise learn about the political, social, and intellectual context out of which these texts emerged. Representative authors on this course include Aphra Behn, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, and Ann Radcliffe.

ENGL 3331 Young Adult Literature (Online Synch) - Heather Cyr

Angst, Love, and Banned Books: In this class, we will study a range of texts to understand how Young Adult Literature has developed into today's forward-looking, massively popular, and often-controversial publishing category. We’ll discuss genre, the bildungsroman, the “hypercanon,” and representation in YA Lit by reading and responding to works in different forms (such as graphic novels, verse novels, music, and film) and genres (such as Dystopia, Romance, and Fantasy). Among other topics, we will explore the roles of book banning, empowerment, protest, fandoms, social justice, and adolescent agency in and upon coming-of-age narratives from the last several decades.

ENGL 3340 Cross-Cultural World Literature (In Person) - Kris Singh

On what do we rely to make sense of the world? In this course, we will study contemporary writing that explores how colonialism and resistance of colonialism produce borders, identities, and narratives that shape our sense of the world today. We will consider how World Literature as a field differs from national and regional frameworks of literary engagement, and we will investigate how this field relates to comparative literature and postcolonial literature. Our particular focus will be the oppressive and resistive powers of language. We will be attentive to language as an instrument of empire while also examining how we distort, break, and adapt language to our benefit.

ENGL 3370 Life Writing (In Person) - Dale Tracy

Living Well: What does it mean to tell a true story? How does art help us to express who we are and what we know? How completely can we know ourselves? In this course, we will engage these questions that life writing raises about the relationship between art and life, focussing on how life writing uses creative self-reflection to explore ways that we might live well together. The texts we will read consider various and intersecting kinds of living well: physical wellness, mental health, community wellbeing, and just social and political structures. Here’s our key question: What kind of knowledge about living well does life writing give us?

ENGL 4350 Topics in Film Studies (In Person) - Kelly Doyle

The Evolution of the Zombie in Horror Film: The cannibalistic zombie figure that plagues the cultural imaginary owes its existence to film; unlike other canonical monsters that originate in Europe and the UK, thanks to George A. Romero's The Night of the Living Dead (1968) the zombie is Americacentric and uniquely filmic in origin. Tracing the emergence of zombie films from the oldest (White Zombie, 1932), to the politically and socially charged contributions of Romero, to the zombie renaissance post 9/11, students will learn how and why this figure in film has evolved from slow to fast, from slave to cannibal, and from human to monster as a mediation on the social and political climate of the times in which this figure manifests using a variety of theoretical perspectives.


Fall 2022 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change. 

ENGL 2316 - English Literary Tradition: 14th to 18th Centuries - Gavin Paul

Voyages, Wanderings, and Imagined Worlds: The Individual and Society. This course will trace the ways in which English literature from the 14th to 18th centuries negotiated private and public experiences. Our readings will take us from the heroic ideals of chivalric romance to colonial encounters with exotic societies and figures, from the solitary challenges and rewards of travel and exploration to the nuances of social hierarchies and individual responsibilities as imagined societies are brought to life on the page. As we move from the oral traditions of poetry to the early forms of the novel, we will consider literature as a burgeoning technology capable of representing and engaging human consciousness—in isolation and within social networks. 

ENGL 2341 - Science Fiction & Fantasy - Robert Pasquini

Aliens and Invasions. Although we do cover actual alien invasions in this course, we also treat aliens and invasions more broadly, meaning that our course texts often articulate concerns regarding belonging, diaspora, otherness, or power, too. No matter what manifestation of aliens or invasions we encounter, students will see how authors use these common tropes and metaphors to criticize their own circumstances or to reimagine their threatened futures. Along the way, students will learn to identify and write about genre conventions from a variety of critical perspectives while learning about the development of Science Fiction and Fantasy from the 1890s to today. 

ENGL 2355 - Literary Classics on Film - Paul Tyndall

In this course, we will explore the relationship between literature and film, examining what is involved in translating works from one medium to one another. We will also consider what makes a film or literary work “a classic.” Readings for the course will include Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, and two short stories adapted for film, Annie Proulx’s “Brokeback Mountain” and Sherman Alexie’s “This is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona.”

ENGL 2430 - Children's Literature - Heather Cyr

Place and Space in 100 Years of Children's Literature. Children’s Literature is a broad and diverse genre that ranges from picture books and pedagogical texts to fairy tales and young adult literature, but each one of these books takes us on a journey through unique places and spaces. In this class, we’ll sail away to Treasure Island, ramble through Terabithia, visit fertile Californian valleys, and swing by a camp for demigods as we explore a century of the genre to identify the development of literature for children as well as current critical and popular concerns. We’ll ask ourselves who makes children’s books, how changing ideas of childhood have influenced the literature we classify as children’s, and how child characters interact with the places and spaces of the stories they inhabit.

ENGL 3306 - Literature of the United States: Beginnings to 1865 - Paul Ohler

Students will study the literature of the United States in English from its beginnings to 1865, focusing on themes and issues related to the developing nation. Students will study works in the following genres: histories and autobiographies, sermons, pamphlets and treatises, letters and addresses, essays, novels, and stories. 

ENGL 3313 - Major Authors: Richard Wright and James Baldwin - Joakim Nilsson

 

Richard Wright and James Baldwin. This course will focus on Richard Wright and James Baldwin, two influential African American writers who explored the impact of racism in America. Influenced by Marxism and Existentialism, Wright used emotional language to tell powerful stories about the brutal effects of racism on the African American psyche. Choosing a more subtle style of writing in both his fiction and non-fiction prose, James Baldwin was often criticized for his unwillingness to simply, and unquestioningly, choose a side; he instead tried to understand and articulate the complexity of race relations in America, while also addressing issues of gender and sexuality.

ENGL 3323 - Seventeenth-Century British Literature - John Rupert

This course will focus on the Black Arts of witchcraft and ritual magic in 17th-century Britain, and on their treatment in the literature and art of the period. Specifically, we will focus on the representation of Satan in portions of John Milton's Paradise Lost, and on the treatment of the black arts in William Shakespeare's Macbeth and The Tempest, in John Ford's The Witch of Edmonton, and in Christopher Marlowe's Dr. Faustus. Our study will be illuminated by consideration of several types of contextual material: condemnatory treatises, historical accounts and critical analyses, and readings in occult ritual and philosophy.

ENGL 3328 - Romantic Poetry and Poetics - Kiran Clements

In this course, we consider Romanticism, not only as a period of history, but as a particular attitude towards humans, ideas and the world as it manifests itself in the literature, art and philosophy of the age.

ENGL 3356 - Modern and Contemporary Poetry - Paul Tyndall

In this course we will study modern and contemporary poetry of witness, i.e. poetry that bears witness to the social, political and cultural upheavals of the 20th and 21st centuries. This includes the poetry of WWI and WWII, the poetry and song of the civil rights movement, and First Nations poetry devoted to redressing the historical injustices associated with colonialism and the residential school system in Canada.

ENGL 3360 - Writing Women/Women Writing - Ranjini Mendis

In this fully asynchronous course, we will read literature by and about women, focusing mainly on postcolonial women's writing. Basing our study on the premise that no text is a disembodied text and that there is "danger of a single story" (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie),  we will examine issues of identity, social expectations, and roles, as well as the intersectionality of gender, race, and class in literary selections.. Students will have many opportunities to respond through informal reader-response forums as well as formal assignments.

ENGL 3390 - Indigenous Narratives, Oral and Written - Jennifer Hardwick

Indigenous stories have the power to teach, heal, build relationships, and transform. This course will explore the social, cultural, and political roles of Indigenous storytelling through a close engagement with literary texts, oral narratives, and new media. Topics of discussion will include de/colonization, gender, history, resistance, representation, and self-determination.

ENGL 4401 - Topics in Canadian Literature in English: Diasporic Writing in Canada - Kris Singh

Diasporic Writing in Canada. In this course, we seek to understand the identities, narratives, and relationships that comprise Canada by reading texts like David Chariandy’s Soucouyant, Kaie Kellough’s Dominoes at the Crossroads, and Souvankham Thammavongsa’s How to Pronounce Knife. We will investigate the term “diaspora” and its applicability to Canadian literature in order to delve into these writers’ definitions of home, thoughts on belonging, and assessments of nostalgia. While our focus will be on contemporary Canadian writing, we will situate these works in longer histories of immigration and colonialism in Canada.

ENGL 4700 - Special Topics in Literature: Imagined Otherwheres - N.P. Kennedy - Online, synchronous

Imagined Otherwheres. The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries—the so-called “age of exploration,” might as well be called “the age of imagining otherwheres.” The “other”—other places, other people, other experiences—could be imagined in ways that would shrivel the heart of anyone familiar with the last few centuries of human experience—as in the case of the eloquent but horrifying sermon that John Donne preached before members of the Virginia Company, urging them, as a sacred duty, to go forth and take the land from people who had “proved” themselves “unworthy” to possess it. Other imaginings of the other, like Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, are rather more favourable. An imagined otherwhere could be used a sort of thought experiment, a means of attempting to imagine a better society, as in the case of More’s Utopia, or one could attempt to “other” the very social system of which one was a part oneself, striving to better understand it, as in the case of Thomas Hobbes and Leviathan. Imagined otherwheres do not need to be geographical; they can be mythological, as in the case of Milton’s imagining of Hell, nostalgic, part of the heartsick incarnation in verse of a way of life that seems lost forever, in the case of some of Herbert’s verse, or purely fantastical, as in the case of Donne’s imagining of the backside of the moon. On one level, this course should be thought of as further training in the skills that used to be lumped together under the umbrella term “rhetoric”: greater skill and confidence in interpreting texts, greater skill and confidence in expounding one’s interpretations, and greater skill and confidence in persuading fellow human beings to share those interpretations. On another level, it is intended to offer personal enrichment: to introduce (or re-introduce) students to works and ideas that have added to the mental life of educated speakers of English for the last few centuries. Finally, it is my very great hope that our contemplating these works of literature together will bring you pleasure—what Chaucer would have called “solas” (solace).


Summer 2022 2000-4000 Level Courses (See below for Fall 2022 and Spring 2023 Course Listings)

*These courses are subject to change.

ENGL 2320 - Studies in Poetry - Mark Cochrane

Students will study the relationship between form and meaning in a variety of poems, and the social, intellectual, and historical influences on those poems. They will study the traditions, conventions, and elements of different poetic forms drawn from different times and socio-cultural contexts.

ENGL 2330 - Studies in Drama: The British Theatre, Medieval to Modern - N. P. Kennedy (Online Synchronous)

British drama—from the miracle and mystery plays of the Middle ages up to the modern era—represents s a vast treasure trove of ways of thinking about and responding to life—truly, what one might call “riches beyond the dreams of avarice.”  One aim of this course is to familiarize students with a number of dramatic works of art that are representative of different styles and different kinds of British drama drawn from and responding to different ways of looking at and of responding to life—or to deepen their familiarity with them, and thus add to their intellectual horizons.  Deeper understanding should foster greater pleasure, so the course will try to live up to the claim, repeated over and over, from ancient Rome to Vaudeville, “of entertaining and edifying.” Another great aim of the course is to help students continue to grow in strength and clarity as thinkers and as writers.

ENGL3305 - Film Theory - Kelly Doyle

Students will study select topics chosen from the history of film theory, which may include but are not restricted to the following: formalism, structuralism/semiotics, auteur theory, feminist/psychoanlytic approaches to spectatorship, post-colonial theory, queer theory. Students will view films and learn to apply critical and theoretical perspectives to the analysis of select films from the silent era to the present day.

ENGL 3315 - Studies in Chaucer - Leanne McDonald

In the latter half of the fourteenth century, Geoffrey Chaucer was living through the lingering aftermath of a global pandemic that still hadn’t ended. His first major work was written as a consolation for the loss of a loved one to the disease, and his most famous later work, The Canterbury Tales, portrays a group of people on a journey to the shrine of a saint who was believed to help the sick. Along the way, they pass the time by telling each other stories that include themes that may be all too familiar to modern readers, such as grief, dark humour, the scapegoating of marginalized people, and the political upheaval caused by post-pandemic labour disputes. In this class, we will engage with Chaucer’s work and reflect on the ways in which our 2022 vantage point helps modern readers connect with certain aspects of Chaucer’s pandemic experience for the first time in generations.

ENGL 3336 - The Victorian Novel 1837-1900: Popular Genres - Robert Pasquini

This course explores the popular genres of the Victorian novel. We move from the “sensation” novel to the historical novel to understand the development of three-volume novels, then we examine the genres that rapidly gained popularity in periodicals like crime, Gothic, or science fiction. In doing so, we determine the formal features, thematic preoccupations, and cultural contexts of Victorian fiction, as well as the period’s enduring impact on today’s arts and literature.

ENGL 3380 - Popular Writing and Culture: Heroes and History: The Graphic Novel in Popular Culture - Gavin Paul

The hero retains a prominent position within the human imagination, shaping the ideals and aspirations at both the individual and cultural level. Our work will focus on variations of the hero in graphic novels of the late 20th and early 21st centuries, positioning our readings within the cultural currents these works respond to and help form. The many figures we will examine include: the “grim and gritty” version of the super-hero that ascended to prominence at the height of the Cold War; the war journalist confronting their own subjective position in the stories they report; the autobiographical self as heroic subject; the dark shadow of the anti-hero in historical fiction.

ENGL 4409 - Topics in Literature of the United States: Beats, Hippies, and New/Gonzo Journalists: Predecessors to American Postmodernism - Steve Weber   

Both the literature of the Beat Generation and New/Gonzo Journalism influenced a generation of hippies and civil rights activists, therefore having broad implications for 20th-century American history and culture. After studying authors like Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Diane di Prima, Amiri Baraka, Joan Didion, and Hunter S. Thompson, this course will conclude with a consideration of how these two literary movements laid the groundwork for a much broader and more prolonged literary movement—American postmodernism. While looking at works by authors such as Ishmael Reed and Thomas Pynchon, we will investigate how American postmodernism is a product of the beats, the hippies, the civil rights movement, and the New/Gonzo Journalists.


Spring 2022 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change.

ENGL 2200 - Foundations of Western Literature - Robert Dearle

Got Myth? In this course we will explore some of the myths, stories, and legends that have informed, influenced, and inspired English and European literature and culture. Our journey will begin with Classical mythology, proceed to stories from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, and end with Norse mythology. As we proceed, we will explore how these stories have been received, retold, and reinterpreted by writers from the renaissance to the present in works of literature as well as in the products of popular culture.

ENGL 2317 - Literature in Transition: From the 18th Century to Today - Deborah Blenkhorn

How can the literature of the past help us to understand today's world? Discover incisive answers as we examine and respond to representative literary works in English from the past three centuries within their sociocultural contexts.

ENGL 2350 - Critical Studies in Film - Kegan Doyle

In this course, we will focus on film as an art and as a cultural phenomenon. We will study how films get made and examine the impact they have on the self and society as a whole. We will also learn innovative new ways to “read” films. Our particular focus will be on films, from Hollywood and elsewhere, about outsiders, misfits, and underdogs. As well as writing analyses and reflections, students will have the option of pursuing creative projects. Films to be discussed include Taxi Driver, Little Miss Sunshine, and Parasite.

ENGL 3330 - Studies in Children's Literature: Children's Fantasy - Heather Cyr

Have you ever been convinced that there is a magical land in the back of the wardrobe? Wondered whether you might be invited to a magical school or confronted by a creature straight from your imagination? In this course, we will focus on fantasy literature for children from the last century, asking why fantasy and the imagination are so closely associated with books for children, how fantastic stories can uniquely challenge children or give them solace, and why so many of these stories are cherished by readers again and again. ENGL2430 not required. Bring your own wands!

ENGL 3301 - Cultivating Canada: Stories That Build Nations - Jennifer Hardwick

The 19th Century was a time of change, violence, growth, alliance, and transition that came to define the the territories we now call Canada.  Through a close engagement with key literary texts and historical documents, we will examine competing identities, values, and goals associated with the establishment of Canada, and explore how founding mythologies continue to impact us today.

ENGL 3308 - U.S. Literature (1910-1945) - Paul Ohler

ENGL 3308 will study U.S. literature of the period 1910-1945. Topics will include literature of the Progressive Era, Modernism, and the Harlem Renaissance.

ENGL 3320 - Studies in Shakespeare: Reading Shakespeare's Shadows - Gavin Paul

A "shadow" meant many things to Shakespeare and his contemporaries: in addition to our familiar sense of darkness or shade, the word could refer to an image, illusion or imitation. It could also denote a spirit or ghost. Not surprisingly, then, it was conventional to refer to stage players as "shadows." This course will explore the grounds covered by these various senses of "shadow": through close, historically-informed readings, we will attend to the multivalence of actors' bodies, tracking the ways in which printed plays can and cannot encode for the nuances of performance.

ENGL 3345 - Diasporic Literatures: Place, Memory, and Identity - Gillian Bright

What is the relationship between place, memory, and identity? For those who leave their homes for new lands, how are these three concepts tested? As a field of inquiry, diaspora studies focus on issues of identity and identification across a range of cultural and national encounters. In this course, we will examine some of the diverse voices that emerge from the complex entanglements between space and self. 

ENGL3358 - British Fiction since 1945 - Paul Ohler

English 3358 surveys the British novel since 1945. Students will explore depictions of post-war life in novels by Muriel Spark and Kingsley Amis. Our study of novels by John Fowles, Graham Swift, and Zadie Smith will focus on their representations of cultural contexts and their postmodern narratives. The course will also examine issues such as shifting gender relations, and the experiences of immigrants in Britain. 

ENGL 3365 - Hollywood Cinema - Paul Tyndall

In this course we will study the history and development of Hollywood Cinema from the silent era to the present day, with particular attention on the diverse ways that film has both reflected and shaped modern American society. We will also consider important social, cultural, economic, and technological developments that have influenced Hollywood Cinema, as well as classic and contemporary films by a wide range of filmmakers.

ENGL 4700 - 19th-Century Hauntings: British and American Gothic Fiction - Kim Larsen

Family secrets and haunted mansions; deviant sexuality; ghosts and atavistic monsters; mental illness, murder, and addiction; slavery and racialized violence – come join us as we explore the dark and dangerous undercurrents of 19th-century British and American cultures. As we work through an assortment of gothic stories and novels across the transatlantic divide, we’ll reflect in particular on the gothic tropes of inheritance and the uncanny return of the repressed, considering the ways in which dominant cultures are haunted by the illicit desires, injustices, anxieties, and obsessions of the past and present. In so doing, we’ll also contemplate the ways in which these gothic hauntings persist in our own 21st-century world.


Fall 2021 2000-4000 Level Courses

*These courses are subject to change.

At the end of August, many Fall English courses announced a change to their mode of delivery. Please see below for each course's method of delivery. In most cases, hybrid courses will move to the classroom when it is safe to do so.

ENGL 2300 - Writing in the Digital Age - Jennifer Hardwick - Changing to hybrid

The Rhetoric of Social Change. Communities across the world are mobilizing digital technologies to share stories, document lives, build movements, and fight injustice. This digital content is changing our world, and shifting our understandings of narrative, language, authorship, privacy, and information in the process. Through an engagement with digital content — that could include podcasts, film, music, tweets, and blog posts — we will build skills in media analysis, visual rhetoric, multimedia composition, and online research, and think deeply about the transformational power of digital story-telling.

ENGL 2316 English Literature: 14th to 18th Centuries - Gavin Paul - Moving online

Voyages, Wanderings, and Imagined Worlds: The Individual and Society. This course will trace the ways in which English literature from the 14th to 18th centuries negotiated private and public experiences. Our readings will take us from the heroic ideals of chivalric romance to colonial encounters with exotic societies and figures, from the solitary challenges and rewards of travel and exploration to the nuances of social hierarchies and individual responsibilities as imagined societies are brought to life on the page. As we move from the oral traditions of poetry to the early forms of the novel, we will consider literature as a burgeoning technology capable of representing and engaging human consciousness—in isolation and within social networks. 

ENGL 2341 - Science Fiction and Fantasy - Robert Pasquini - Moving online

ENGL 2341 demonstrates the value of Science Fiction and Fantasy in modern life. We cover topics showing how authors invented literary worlds in order to criticize their present-day circumstances or to re-imagine their threatened futures. Students will learn to identify and write about genre conventions from a variety of critical perspectives. Texts will be drawn from several forms (novella, short story, poetry, film) from 1895 to today. 

ENGL 2430 Children’s Literature - Heather Cyr - Moving online

Place and Space in 100 Years of Children's Literature. Children’s Literature is a broad and diverse genre that ranges from picture books and pedagogical texts to fairy tales and young adult literature, but each one of these books takes us on a journey through unique places and spaces. In this class, we’ll sail away to Treasure Island, ramble through Terabithia, visit fertile Californian valleys, and swing by Camp Halfblood as we explore a century of the genre to identify the development of literature for children as well as current critical and popular concerns. We’ll ask ourselves who makes children’s books, how changing ideas of childhood have influenced the literature we classify as children’s, and how child characters interact with the places and spaces of the stories they inhabit.

ENGL 3300 - Critical Theory - Paul Ohler - Face-to-face (no change)

ENGL 3300 introduces students to questions debated by philosophers, writers, and critics over questions about the nature, Function, and value of literature. The course will ask students to consider questions such as those posed by the literary scholar Sue Schopf: How can we deal objectively with literary art? How can readers gain greater access to the richness and complexity of literary texts? What criteria do we use to determine a work's "greatness"? What do we mean when we speak of the "beauty" of a literary work? What is the function of the artist, the critic, and of criticism and theory itself? How do we account for multiple interpretations of a text? Does literary language differ from ordinary language? Beginning with Aristotle's Poetics, the course will consider these questions in the context of key works of literary theory and criticism.

ENGL 3303 - Canadian Poetry - Jennifer Hardwick - Changing to hybrid

Contested Territories. Loved, contested, feared, stolen, protected, poisoned, settled, admired — Canada’s land has been many things to many people, and it has captured the hearts and imaginations of poets for generations. Through a close engagement with written, multimedia, and oral texts, this course will explore the role of land in Canada’s poetry, with a special attention to topics such as colonization, the environment, and national identity.

ENGL 3305 - Film Theory - Paul Tyndall (Newly announced!) - Hybrid (no change)

Most of us have grown up watching films and television, and we have internalized a huge amount of knowledge about mainstream cinema. But few people reflect on film as an art form or communication technology. In this course, we will do just that as we read some of the major theoretical statements in the history of film theory and apply their insights to representative films from the silent period to the present day. Though most of the readings on the syllabus are relatively brief, several present complex and subtle arguments. Together we will be unpacking these arguments and considering their usefulness for making sense of film as a form of visual storytelling. 

ENGL 3321 - English Renaissance Drama, Excluding ShakespeareN.P. Kennedy - Online (no change)

Shakespeare was a genius, but far from being all alone in the dark--he lived in an age of brilliant playwrights--who knew, imitated, collaborated with, competed with, and sometimes even ridiculed each other. Discover the rivals of Shakespeare.

ENGL 3340 - Cross-Cultural World Literature - Ranjini Mendis (online) - Online (no change)

Differing Perspectives, Changing Worlds. In this fully asynchronous course on the topic "Differing Perspectives, Changing Worlds," students will study works of cross-cultural world literature drawn mainly from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will explore critical concepts and issues that arise in cross-cultural fields of study identified as “World Literature,” “Postcolonial Literature,” and “Global Anglophone Literature.” Through a wide selection of texts, students will examine influences of colonization, postcolonial conflicts, and effects of migration and cultural re-orientations.

ENGL 3350 - Literature and Film - Greg Chan - Face-to-face (no change)

Amplifying BIPOC Voices. Truth and Reconciliation. Black Lives Matter. Stop AAPI Hate. DREAMers. My Red Line. Now more than ever, racialized communities are uniting in their resistance to colonialism, rising up to tell their own stories on the page and the screen. Focusing on marginalized voices from the Indigenous, Black, Asian, and Latinx communities, this course invites students to learn more about the cultural weight of BIPOC representation and storytelling. Course work will focus on literary works by Richard Wagamese, Lawrence Hill, Kevin Kwan, Khaled Hosseini, and Quiara Alegria Hudes that have been adapted into critically acclaimed feature films. Press “Play” on English 3350 this fall to experience stories from racialized artists who are in a fight to be seen and heard.

ENGL 3352 - British Novel, 1900-1945 - Robert Dearle - Hybrid (no change)

In this section of English 3352 we will read five key novels that offer various perspectives on life, culture, and art in England during the transformational period 1900-1945. Topics include class, revolutionary movements, women’s roles, sex and sexualities, the past, the future, and the looming threat of a second world war. Please note that this class will be held in a partially online (hybrid) format: face-to-face meetings will alternate with synchronous / asynchronous online elements.

ENGL 4420 - Topics in British Literature - Leanne MacDonald - Changing to hybrid

Home/Away From Home: Gender and Home in Medieval Britain. In the last year, many of us have spent more time at home than we ever expected (or wanted) to. At first glance, it might seem that women in the Middle Ages also largely stayed home for their entire lives, watching men go out into the world to work, fight, pray, and socialize. In reality, life in medieval Britain was much more complicated than that. In this course, we will explore this complexity by examining a gender-diverse group of nobles, sex workers, travelers, knights, the undead, and other figures from literary and historical texts written by or about women and gender non-binary people in the Middle Ages. We will examine these works from a variety of different historical, social, and cultural perspectives in order to better understand how medieval writers both reinforced and challenged notions of a medieval woman’s place in the home, as well as the gender binary.


NOTE:  Students may take a 4000 level English topics course for credit more than once during their English degree if the topic is different.

 

2018 English Graduates