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ARTS Courses

arts1100

Explore different disciplines of an Arts Degree in one of our Arts Courses. Through courses that explore a different topic each semester from a multidiscipline perspective (ARTS 1100), or an intensive interdisciplinary field school in the Amazon rain forest (ARTS 3000) students gain knowledge that spans multiple areas of study. For more information about how these exciting courses fit within your degree, please make an appointment to see an Arts Degree Advisor on Advisor Connect.

ARTS 3200 Inside-out Prison Exchange: Fall 2022

Connection, Communication & Story

Lubna Moosa (Journalism) & Nicola Harwood (Creative Writing & IDEA)

Class meets on Wednesdays, 9:30am-3:20pm
at Surrey Pre-Trial Services Centre
l4323 57 Ave, Surrey, BC V3X 1B1

Application Webform: kpu.ca/arts/3200

Deadline for Application: 1p.m. July 15, 2022

The Inside-Out Prisoner Exchange Program works with equal numbers of learner from KPU and incarcerated learners inside prison in a transformative, collaborative learning community. In this iteration of Inside-Out, students will examine issues related to communication. Studying and practicing pesonal, inter-personal and public communication with an emphasis on developing emotional literacy, a grounded sense of and ability to community through conflict, student swill learn how to speak their minds clearly and from the heart. We will look at story as a powerful tool to communicate the deeper truth of who we are, and we will examine how stories told about us, can serve to oppress or liberate. This class will be experiential and participatory with students engaging in both theory and practice of communication.

Pre-Application and Interview Required

Students will attend class within a local corrections facility. This is an intensive, upper-level course (pre req: 60 credits and permission of  instructor) with high leels of commitment expected. Accepted students must provide a criminal record check, agree to a code of conduct, and adhere to prison visitor policies. All students must have proof of double examination befroe entering the prison.

Application Webform: kpu.ca/arts/3200

Deadline for Application: 1p.m. July 15, 2022

 

ARTS 2000 The Practice of Wellness: Fall 2022

Instructor: Ross Laird

Thursdays 1-4pm, Surrey campus

What does it mean to be healthy? How are health and well-being connected? Especially during times of turbulence and stress - such as a pandemic, or climate change - how can we stay emotionally healthy and connected to ourselves and those around us? What kinds of coping are normal and helpful? When does normal coping become unhealthy, addictive, or damaging? In such situations, how might we develop strategies to ensure that we don't slide into burnout, trauma, mental illness, or deep distress? And if we do: how do we find our way forward? 

In ARTS 2000, we'll explore these themes and examine evidence-based strategies for cultivating mental health and wellness, building capacity in relationships and families, and navigating stressful circumstances toward healthy outcomes for everyone.
 

 

 

ARTS 1100: Experiencing the Arts

Students will explore a broad and compelling theme through the lens of different Arts disciplines. The theme will change each semester. The course will be run by an instructor who is passionate about the theme, with class sessions taught by visiting instructors from areas such as History, Psychology, Geography, Fine Arts, Political Science, and other fields. This will help students realize how different fields within Arts are connected, as well as suggest directions for further study. They will learn to view their world through multiple, and sometimes contrasting, perspectives and develop intellectual skills which are essential for learning in various disciplines and for continued learning in life beyond the University.

ARTS 2000 The Practice of Wellness

What does it mean to be healthy? How are health and well-being connected? Especially during times of turbulence and stress — such as a pandemic, or climate change — how can we stay emotionally healthy and connected to ourselves and those around us? What kinds of coping are normal and helpful? When does normal coping become unhealthy, addictive, or damaging? In such situations, how might we develop strategies to ensure that we don’t slide into burnout, trauma, mental illness, or deep distress? And if we do: how do we find our way forward?

In Arts 2000, we’ll explore these themes and examine evidence-based strategies for cultivating mental health and wellness, building capacity in relationships and families, and navigating stressful circumstances toward healthy outcomes for everyone.

Instructor: Ross Laird

Class Day/Time/Campus: Thursdays 1-4pm, Surrey

ARTS 3000: Interdisciplinary Amazon Field School

Learners will engage in an intensive interdisciplinary field school in the Amazon rain forest. They will take part in cultural and creative immersion activities, participate in community engagement projects, and contextualize their field learning by classroom-based analysis and critical reflection before and after their field experiences. They will develop interdisciplinary skills in creativity, academic inquiry, ecology and conservation, cultural awareness, environmental design, design thinking, and community development. Learners will become familiar with various expressive modalities of the Amazon region (e.g. design, writing, music, movement, expressive arts, materiality, storytelling, etc.) and will explore the application of those modalities in an integrative learning environment. Note: Students will spend two weeks at the Field School site in addition to class sessions on campus before and after travel. Students must be nineteen years or older at the start of the course

ARTS 3200: Inside-Out Prison Exchange

The Inside-Out Prisoner Exchange Program works with equal numbers of learner from KPU and incarcerated learners inside prison in a transformative, collaborative learning community. In this iteration of Inside-Out, students will examine issues related to communication. Studying and practicing pesonal, inter-personal and public communication with an emphasis on developing emotional literacy, a grounded sense of and ability to community through conflict, student swill learn how to speak their minds clearly and from the heart. We will look at story as a powerful tool to communicate the deeper truth of who we are, and we will examine how stories told about us, can serve to oppress or liberate. This class will be experiential and participatory with students engaging in both theory and practice of communication.

Pre-Application and Interview Required

Students will attend class within a local corrections facility. This is an intensive, upper-level course (pre req: 60 credits and permission of  instructor) with high leels of commitment expected. Accepted students must provide a criminal record check, agree to a code of conduct, and adhere to prison visitor policies. All students must have proof of double examination befroe entering the prison.

INSIDE-OUT PRISON EXCHANGE: FALL 2022

Class meets on Wednesdays, 9:30am-3:20pm
at Surrey Pre-Trial Services Centre
l4323 57 Ave, Surrey, BC V3X 1B1

Application Webform: kpu.ca/arts/3200

Deadline for Application: 1p.m. July 15, 2022

 

ARTS 4800: Arts Practicum

The ARTS practicum course introduces students to the workplace and degree-relevant entry-level work through placement in an employment setting. During the term, students complete 48 to 64 workplace hours (approximately 4-6 hours per week). The course is for senior students with a declared Major or Minor in Geography, History, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Journalism or Political Science. For more information visit the Arts Practicum website.

ARTS 3991, 3992, 3993: Undergraduate Research and Scholarship

Students will conduct research and scholarship in collaboration with a faculty mentor. This course will offer experiential learning in an academic setting by partnering students with faculty who have, or are initiating, research projects. Students will advance their research and professional skills, integrating these skills within a faculty-led project, through such activities as conducting a literature review, applying for Research Ethics Board approval, conducting research, applying research methods, drafting and revising reviews and/or articles, researching and compiling materials for conference presentations, and performing data analysis.

For program-specific information please contact: arts@kpu.ca

For administrative questions please contact: Mary Illical.

Decolonizing Music Education: Contemporary Perspectives and Implications for Innovative Curricular Design of Post-Secondary Music Degree Programs

This Project addresses fundamental issues at the forefront of contemporary education. It investigates current perspectives on decolonization and explores how the curricular design of post-secondary degree programs may be affected by them. In the Fall 2021 semester, the student research assistant will collaborate with the instructor to assess, organize, and collate findings from previously completed research, survey digital and print literature, and develop strategies for innovative curricular design. In future semesters, students may have the opportunity to contribute to published articlesthat documents the team's findings and participate in conference presentations. This project has student learning outcomes appropriate to meet a 3 Credit Course. 

Minimum Qualifications Required: 

Current participation in a post-secondary, undergraduate degree program; an interest in decolonization, social justice, or the de-centralization of historical European and American perspectives on curricular design, the ability to review and summarize digital and print materials; the ability to communicate clearly and effectively in English through speaking and writing; the ability to work collaboratively within a team and under supervision of a faculty mentor. 

Contact Email: daniel.tones@kpu.ca

Portraits of the Artist as a Kept Man: Normative Masculinity in American Literature and Film, 1945-1961

I am working on two articles that both explore the issue of masculinity and normative gender roles in the post-World War Two era. One article focuses on questioning how radial Jack Kerouac's novel On the Road truly was, especially in its portrayal of gender roles. I argue that by eliminating Dean's bisexuality from initial draft of the novel, Kerouac made Dean more traditionally heterosexual, ans thus more acceptable to mainstream audiences. I will compare this novel to Ginsberg's poem Howl and Baldwin's novel Giovanni's Room, which were criticized for their more open portrayal of homosexuality and questioning of traditional gender norms. The second article focuses on exploring four Hollywood films that present the male artist as a kept man, thus violating traditional gender normas by giving the woman the financial power in the relationship: Humouresque (1946), Sunset Boulevard (1950), An American in Paris (1951), and  Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). The student will explore theses texts, and also do background research on gender roles in the time period, as well as find scholarly articles and books on these texts. This will be a 3 credit course. 

Minimum Qualifications Required: 

A strong interest in literature and folm and in the topic of gender roles, especially masculinities, and experience researching and writing about literature. 

Contact Email: joakim.nilsson@kpu.ca

Exploring the Backstage of Climate Science Assessment: An Ethnographic study of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

This 3 credit course centers on the analysis of qualitative interview data that was gathered in 2018, 2019 and 2020 through open-ended, semi-structured interviews with social and natural scientists who are volunteering to write Assessment Reports for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. It is expected that students will code data using NVivo qualitative data analysis software according to a coding scheme developed with the faculty mentor. Students will also be asked to write an annotated bibliography relevant to the ethnographic study of climate change and global environmental assessments.

The first part of the term will consist of gaining familiarity with NVivo and writing the annotated bibliography. The second part of the term will focus on data analysis. As course outcomes, students will learn how to conduct qualitative data analysis, and gain an understanding of climate change as a social and political problem.

Minimum Qualifications Required:
The ability to adhere to the highest ethical standards of Academic Integrity and preserve the confidentiality of data is of paramount importance. The ability to think critically, ask questions, and communicate clearly is essential. Preference will be given to students who can demonstrate familiarity with qualitative research methods, qualitative data analysis, the sociology of scientific knowledge or science and technology studies, and the role, purpose and history of the IPCC. Instruction will be provided on how to use NVivo qualitative data analysis software.

Contact Email:
mark.vardy@kpu.ca

Dialectical Map (DMap): A cognitive tool for writing

One of the most highly valued goals of higher education is critical thinking. At the core of many learning activities is argumentation/persuasion which requires critical thinking. Students find it difficult to demonstrate effective argumentation/persuasion in assignments or learning activities. Dialectical map (DMap) is an open source educational software which visualizes the structure of argument and can help students in writing argumentative essays. This research project started at SFU and we also received a grant from BCIT to conduct this research. This is a 3 credit course.

Minimum Qualifications Required:
The student researcher must be comfortable working data analyzing software like SPSS. The student should be prepared for a heavy reading load and be able to work independently and with consistent pace. They should have the ability to grasp and articulate the central arguments of scholarly articles and books. It would be an asset for the student to have significant experience with using library citation tools. The student might need to attend the weekly meeting of the research team.

Contact Email:
Azar.Pakdamansavoji@kpu.ca

Influencing what is possible: Supporting the Class of 2020+

The student researcher is responsible for conducting an environmental scan and composing a literature review related to post-university transition and experience of recent post-secondary graduates during the COVID-19 pandemic. They will assist with the implementation of a national survey on the experience of the Class of 2020+. If time permits, they will also help with reviewing and representing participant data from the recent KPU Graduate Career Accelerator Program.

Minimum Qualifications Required:
The ideal student researcher is a ‘sponge’ who is open and likes to soak up learning. They should be prepared for a heavy reading load and be able to work independently and with consistent pace. They should have the ability to grasp and articulate the central arguments of scholarly articles and books. Finally, they should be able to interpret qualitative and quantitative data.

Contact Email:

candy.ho@kpu.ca

Creating a Collaborative Digital Memorial with People Affected by the Overdose Crisis

This is a Chancellor’s Chair research project focused on collaboratively constructing three digital memorials with people affected by the overdose crisis. The project is running for three years, and is led by Aaron Goodman, faculty member in the Journalism and Communication Studies department at KPU. Two student research assistants are working hard on the project, and we would welcome additional participation and assistance from students.

Students may perform the following tasks and others:

  • Taking part in remote, weekly meetings with Aaron and research assistants.
  • Helping to record remote peer-to-peer audio interviews with people who have lost family members, partners, colleagues, and others to fatal overdoses.
  • Editing audio interviews.
  • Finding scholarly journal articles and other sources relevant to the project.
  • Writing research summaries about scholarly journal articles and other sources.
  • Helping to conceptualize three digital memorials.

Minimum Qualifications Required: 

30 Credits from courses at the 1100 level of higher, and approval of the Dean. 

Contact Email: aaron.goodman@kpu.ca

EDIing HIgher Education: Unpacking Multiple Tensions

This study aims to explore faculty and administrators' perceptions and to unveil tensions surrounding equity, diversity, and includsion (EDI) processes in higher education through a case study of EDI process currently underway at KPU. I am interested in unpacking tensions between EDI discourses and practice as well as in exploring the diverse reasons for supporting or critiquing EDI processes. 3 Credits, 2 Students. Students will conduct lit review, data analysis, transcribing, and editing. 

Minimum Qualifications Required:

English proficiency, good reading, writing, and editing skills, good work ethics, critical thinking and self-discipline, interests in the research topic. 

Contact Email: lilach.marom@kpu.ca

EDIing HIgher Education: Unpacking Multiple Tensions

This study aims to explore faculty and administrators' perceptions and to unveil tensions surrounding equity, diversity, and includsion (EDI) processes in higher education through a case study of EDI process currently underway at KPU. I am interested in unpacking tensions between EDI discourses and practice as well as in exploring the diverse reasons for supporting or critiquing EDI processes. 3 Credits, 2 Students. Students will conduct lit review, data analysis, transcribing, and editing. 

Minimum Qualifications Required:

English proficiency, good reading, writing, and editing skills, good work ethics, critical thinking and self-discipline, interests in the research topic. 

Contact Email: lilach.marom@kpu.ca

British Columbia’s Pacific Northwest Forensic Research & Training Facility

The Department of Anthropology has a unique opportunity for a student to engage in administrative and research duties for the development of a multi-use Forensic Research & Training Facility in British Columbia. The project will be collaborative in nature and will include KPU (Anthropology and interdepartmental), SFU, BCIT and several external stakeholders (Provincial Government, Policing agencies, JIBC, Coroner’s Service, Search and Rescue, and more). Student learning outcomes include professional development, project co-ordination, drafting proposals, applications for funding and other documentation, high-level collaborative work, and research experience in medico-legal death investigation.

Minimum Qualifications Required:

Upper-level courses in Biological Anthropology, Criminology, Biology, Nursing, other disciplines with relevant experience may be considered. Administrative, document management, and research experience are highly valued; field school, relevant teamwork or other outdoor experience is beneficial. This project may be extended for up to three semesters (ARTS 3991, 3992, 3993) and will require long-term commitment to project outcomes. Proficiency in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, relational databases, research tools, and a high-level professionalism are required. May require attending meetings and field site visits. Resume, cover letter, transcripts, and references required. This research course is best suited for students interested in forensic science, death investigation, or law enforcement. Open to all applicants.

Contact Email: ken.andrews@kpu.ca

Influencing what is possible: Supporting the Class of 2020+

The student researcher is responsible for conducting an environmental scan of both scholarly (academic journal) and popular (blog, trade publications, etc.) articles and composing a literature review related to post-university transition and experiences of recent post-secondary graduates during the COVID-19 pandemic. They will assist with the implementation of a national survey on the experience of the Class of 2020+.

Minimum Qualifications Required:

The ideal student researcher possesses good search, summarizing, and critical thinking skills. Working independently and with support and guidance whenever they need, they should have the ability to grasp and articulate the central arguments of scholarly articles and books and to identify common themes.

Contact Email: candy.ho@kpu.ca